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Simply, I need to do as the title says: Call a child static method from parent. The problem is that I don't know the child class name in the parent as there could be multiple children. The static method needs to stay static. For example:

class A{ // parent class
public:
 void process(){
  getData(); //  <-- Problem
 }
}

class B: public A{ // child class
 static int getData();
}

void main(){
 B b;
 b.process();
}

One solution that comes to mind is to have a virtual method that calls the static method. This would not be very nice and it would mean I would have to implement the method for every child I have:

class A{ // parent class
 virtual int getDataFromStaticMethod() = 0;
public:
 void process(){
  getData(); //  <-- Problem
 }
}

class B: public A{ // child class
 static int getData();
 virtual int getDataFromStaticMethod(){
  return B::getData();
 }
}

void main(){
 B b;
 b.process();
}

But I really wish it was possible to implement a pure virtual method with a static method:

class A{ // parent class
 virtual int getData() = 0;
public:
 void process(){
  getData(); //  <-- Problem
 }
}

class B: public A{ // child class
 static int getData();
}

void main(){
 B b;
 b.process();
}

Any suggestions?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
What happens if two child classes implement that static getData method? Which one would you want to call then? – yzt Aug 11 '13 at 22:16
    
Suggestion: Do not use a static function. The difference of a static and a nonstatic function is that the nonstatic function can only be called when an instance of the class (the this pointer) is known. In your case it seems that you always have an instance, thus you can use a nonstatic function. Or is there any reason for a static function that I neglected? – Daniel S. Aug 11 '13 at 22:17
    
@yzt If I have two classes B and C that both inherit A, I would want to call B's static method when calling b.process() and C's static method when calling c.process(). Or did you mean some special case with multiple inheritance? – StackOverflowUser Aug 11 '13 at 22:18
4  
@StackOverflowUser Well, this is a perfect use case for non-static virtual functions... – user529758 Aug 11 '13 at 22:21
2  
@StackOverflowUser: In this case you are describing, I believe the best and simplest solution is the one you mention in your question. I'd even go as far as to say that it's a textbook use of virtual methods and polymorphism! – yzt Aug 11 '13 at 22:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use templates.

template<typename TChild>
class A
{
   typedef TChild child_type;

public:
   void process()
   {
      child_type::getData();
   }
};

class B: public A<B>
{
   static int getData();
};

class C: public A<C>
{
   static int getData();
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
   B b;
   b.process();

   C c;
   c.process();
}

Note:

If you want to hold static state in your base class, or if you need to hold a collection of base class objects, then you would need an additional layer:

class ABase
{
   //any static state goes here
public:
   virtual int process() = 0;
};

template<typename TChild>
class A: public ABase
{
   typedef TChild child_type;

public:
   int process()
   {
      child_type::getData();
   }
};


class B: public A<B>
{};


std::vector<ABase*> a_list;
share|improve this answer
    
This kind of CRTP usage might be suitable, but if falls apart if A has any kind of static state. Wouldn't it? – yzt Aug 11 '13 at 22:30
    
Yep. If you reallllllly want to have static state for the parent class, then you could make an additional layer, i.e. ABase, with A<> deriving from ABase, and hold your static state in ABase. – Gerald Aug 11 '13 at 22:35
1  
Thank you very much, I am overwhelmed by all the answers to my question, wasn't expecting such a feedback :) I am going with this answer as it is something I was looking for. Thank you! – StackOverflowUser Aug 11 '13 at 22:36

Assuming the signature of the child functions are all identical, you could initialize your base class object to hold a pointer to the child's version of the getData() function, e.g.:

class A {
    int (*d_getData)();
protected:
    explicit A(int (*getData)()): d_getData(getData) {}
public:
    void process() {
        int data = (this->d_getData)();
        // ...
    }
};

Obviously, the child classes would need to provide the corresponding constructor argument:

class B: public A {
    static int whatever();
public:
    B(): A(&whatever) {}
    // ...
};

That's sort of an implementation of a per object overridable virtual function.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I thought about at first too, but this falls apart when more than one class inherits from A. (Read the comments on the question.) – yzt Aug 11 '13 at 22:27
1  
@yzt: If there are multiple viable functions, just pass the one which is needed. I don't see any reason that the approach "falls apart" at all! There is plenty of flexibility and each derived object can choose a different static function to be called if necessary. – Dietmar Kühl Aug 11 '13 at 22:30
    
Right you are! This could very well work. I thought d_getData was static. My mistake. – yzt Aug 11 '13 at 22:34

You can use virtual wrappers around the static function. E.g.

class A{ // parent class
 // don't make pure virtual if you don't want to define it in all child classes
 virtual int getData() { return 0 };
public:
 void process(){
  getData();
 }
}

class B: public a{ // child class
 static int do_getData();
 int getData() { return do_getData(); }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is something I described in the second portion of my question. It is a possibility but it does mean I would have to implement the getData method in every child. Thanks though. – StackOverflowUser Aug 11 '13 at 22:35
    
You only need to implement getData() in children that need it (i.e. have a static member they need to call). I don't know enough about your program to answer definitively. – Jonathan Potter Aug 11 '13 at 22:38

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