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I'd simply like to know if the following is possible to do somehow.

public void foo(int a) {
    String a = Integer.toString(a);
}

Now obviously this code doesn't actually work; the string a shadows the parameter a. What I'd like to know is, is there a way to explicitly tell the compiler "Hey, this is actually that other a up there!" I'm looking for something similar to the this keyword, except for method parameters.

Is there anything like this or am I forced to use a different variable name?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, this feature does not exist in java. You should just make up another variable name.

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You can do-

String ab = Integer.toString(a);

Even if you could use the same variable name as the parameter variable, it would create confusion. You cannot do that in Java. Just use some other variable name.

Also, modifying method parameters are not a good idea. Rather, have them declared final like-

public void foo(final int a) {
    String ab = Integer.toString(a);
}
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+1 for final method parameters. –  Boris the Spider Aug 11 '13 at 22:50
    
I'm not modifying the method parameter in my code though! –  Marconius Aug 12 '13 at 0:44

You can't do that but you could overload the method

public void foo(int a) {
    foo(Integer.toString(a));
}

public void foo(String a) {
//    
}
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For what you want to do, you should probably just create another variable. For example:

public void foo(int a1) {
    String a = Integer.toString(a1);
}
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You cannot have twice the same name of the variable in the same range. But you can override names of the variables, fields for example:

class A
{
    int a;
    void f(int a)
    {
        this.a = a;
    }
}

Now field a is overridden, and using this you can refer to the overriden field.

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