Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would consider myself an intermediate beginner in Python as I have completed all but the last few chapters of LPTHW and have completed several other tutorials as well. However, I cannot seem to figure out OOP. Let me give an example. If I tried to write a simple city sim game, could I have a class 'Buildings', with a method called 'function' that changes what it does depending on the parameters? So, take for example this

class Buildings(object):
    def __init__(self, function):
        self.function = function
    def function(self):
        if function == '1':
            print 'blablabla'
        elif function == '2':
            print 'blablabla'



Granary = Building('1')
Granary.function()

(replacing numbers with actual names of actions and print statements with actual functions) Is this how classes are supposed to be used? (after all, 'There should be preferably one and only one way of doing things' is apparently what pythonistas are supossed to believe :p) Or is there a more efficient way of doing this? Or am I an idiot?

share|improve this question
    
Thats a definite yes, but only if self.function changes. In the example that you are showing us, it will not change because you are clearly defining self.function statically to a value of '1', which will result in 'blablabla'. –  enginefree Aug 11 '13 at 22:53
    
There's a number of errors in your code. Building vs Buildings, the functions in the if/elif statements should be self.function... –  roippi Aug 11 '13 at 22:54
    
I wrote this in a rush, but hopefully you can get the meaning. –  hiragana Aug 11 '13 at 23:00
    
I think you should make Building a super class and Granary, Library and so on its subclasses. –  Akavall Aug 11 '13 at 23:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is what I think you want:

class Buildings(object):
    def __init__(self, function):
        self.function = function
    # Don't name an attribute the same as a method
    def myMethod(self):
        # Use self.function instead of function
        if self.function == '1':
            print 'blablabla'
        elif self.function == '2':
            print 'blablabla'



Granary = Buildings('1')
Granary.myMethod()

Edit:

Going by what you said in your comments, I have to say the answer depends on what you plan to do. Every scenario is different and in one, something might not be the best solution even though it was the best in another. Usually, there isn't really a reason to make a whole class with only one method. For example, in your above code, you can also do:

def Buildings(function):
    if function == '1':
        print 'blablabla'
    elif function == '2':
        print 'blablabla'
Buildings('1')

to get the exact same result.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Downvoter - Could you please list a reason you downvoted? I take the quality of my work very seriously. So, if you found a problem, please let me know so that I can either fix my post or explain better what I did. –  iCodez Aug 11 '13 at 23:29
    
Might have been a misclick when he meant to approve instead. –  hfaran Aug 12 '13 at 0:05
    
@Core2uu - No, the answer was already accepted. Thank you though. –  iCodez Aug 12 '13 at 0:07

Here is the class rewritten to do what I think you want it to:

class Building(object):
    def __init__(self, case):
        self.case = case
    def function(self):
        if self.case == '1':
            print 'blablabla'
        elif self.case == '2':
            print 'blablabla'



Granary = Building('1')
Granary.function()

There are numerous ways to do what you want and above is one.

share|improve this answer
    
so basically, I can do it this way? Is it the most efficient way? I heard once on this site that making a class with only init and one method is a complicated way of doing something which should be easy. –  hiragana Aug 11 '13 at 23:02
    
This will explode because Building isn't defined. Do Granary = Buildings('1') –  iCodez Aug 11 '13 at 23:03
    
lol I think one run of the program would have told me that. I am a newbie and I wrote this code in about 20 seconds. You got the meaning so it's all good right? –  hiragana Aug 11 '13 at 23:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.