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Goal

In ZSH script, for a given args, I want to obtain the first string and the rest.

For instance, when the script is named test

sh test hello

supposed to extract h and ello.

ZSH manual

http://zsh.sourceforge.net/Doc/zsh_a4.pdf

says:

Subscripting may also be performed on non-array values, in which case the subscripts specify a substring to be extracted. For example, if FOO is set to ‘foobar’, then ‘echo $FOO[2,5]’ prints ‘ooba’.

Q1

So, I wrote a shell script in a file named test

echo $1
echo $1[1,1]

terminal:

$ sh test hello
hello
hello[1,1]

the result fails. What's wrong with the code?

Q2

Also I don't know how to extract subString from n to the last. Perhaps do I have to use Array split by regex?

EDIT: Q3

This may be another question, so if it's proper to start new Thread, I will do so.

Thanks to @skishore Here is the further code

#! /bin/zsh

echo $1

ARG_FIRST=`echo $1 | cut -c1`
ARG_REST=`echo $1 | cut -c2-`
echo ARG_FIRST=$ARG_FIRST
echo ARG_REST=$ARG_REST

if $ARG_FIRST = ""; then
  echo nullArgs
else
  if $ARG_FIRST = "@"; then
    echo @Args
  else
    echo regularArgs
  fi
fi

I'm not sure how to compare string valuables to string, but for a given args hello

result:

command not found: h

What's wrong with the code?

EDIT2:

What I've found right

#! /bin/zsh

echo $1

ARG_FIRST=`echo $1 | cut -c1`
ARG_REST=`echo $1 | cut -c2-`
echo ARG_FIRST=$ARG_FIRST
echo ARG_REST=$ARG_REST

if [ $ARG_FIRST ]; then
  if [ $ARG_FIRST = "@" ]; then
    echo @Args
  else
    echo regularArgs
  fi
else
  echo nullArgs
fi

EDIT3:

As the result of whole, this is what I've done with this question.

https://github.com/kenokabe/GitSnapShot

GitSnapShot is a ZSH thin wrapper for Git commands for easier and simpler usage

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use the cut command:

echo $1 | cut -c1 
echo $1 | cut -c2-

Use backticks to assign these values to variables:

ARG_FIRST=`echo $1 | cut -c1`
ARG_REST=`echo $1 | cut -c2-`
echo ARG_FIRST=$ARG_FIRST
echo ARG_REST=$ARG_REST
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @skishore, your code works, but how can I store the result to, say, argFirst and argRest? –  Ken OKABE Aug 12 '13 at 0:45
1  
Not sure how to format comments nicely, so I edited my answer. –  skishore Aug 12 '13 at 0:52
    
eah, I just did without quotation.. Works perfect. You are cool. Thank s a lot! –  Ken OKABE Aug 12 '13 at 0:54
    
I have another quesion, and if you have a thought, plz let me know @skishore –  Ken OKABE Aug 12 '13 at 1:30
1  
See here for how to compare strings: stackoverflow.com/questions/2237080/… Basically the comparison lines should look like if [[ "$ARG_FIRST" == "" ]]; then –  skishore Aug 12 '13 at 1:35

So, I wrote a shell script in a file named test

$ sh test hello

This isn't a zsh script: you're calling it with sh, which is (almost certainly) bash. If you've got the shebang (#!/bin/zsh), you can make it executable (chmod +x <script>) and run it: ./script. Alternatively, you can run it with zsh <script>.

the result fails. What's wrong with the code?

You can wrap in braces:

echo ${1}        # This'll work with or without the braces.
echo ${1[3,5]}   # This works in the braces. 
echo $1[3,5]     # This doesn't work. 

Running this: ./test-script hello gives:

./test-script.zsh hello 
hello
llo
./test-script.zsh:5: no matches found: hello[3,5]

Also I don't know how to extract subString from n to the last. Perhaps do I have to use Array split by regex?

Use the [n,last] notation, but wrap in braces. We can determine how long our variable is with, then use the length:

# Store the length of $1 in LENGTH. 
LENGTH=${#1}
echo ${1[2,${LENGTH}]}  # Display from `2` to `LENGTH`. 

This'll produce ello (prints from the 2nd to the last character of hello).

Script to play with:

#!/usr/local/bin/zsh

echo ${1}      # Print the input
echo ${1[3,5]} # Print from 3rd->5th characters of input
LENGTH=${#1}   
echo ${1[2,${LENGTH}]} # Print from 2nd -> last characters of input.

You can use the cut command:

But that would be using extra baggage - zsh is quite capable of doing all this on it's own without spawning multiple sub-shells for simplistic operations.

share|improve this answer
    
Debian & Ubuntu nowadays have sh link to the more minimal dash (not not bash as stated above). (See: Dash as /bin/sh) –  zrajm Sep 6 '13 at 8:54
    
You don't need the LENGTH thing, you can just use -1 instead. As in ${1[2;-1]} –  kralyk Jul 1 at 14:11

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