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I am writing a Java framework that prints logging messages with ANSI color codes. Of course, there is always the chance that users could be using it from within Eclipse, in which case the ANSI escape codes appear as garbage characters on the console. It would be nice to autodetect this, so that users don't have to turn it off manually.

I've done some Googling on the subject, and I suspect that it can't be done, but not many people have tried, so I figured it was worth asking. One method that comes to mind is checking whether "xterm".equals(System.getenv("TERM")), which sort of works, but has a lot of exceptions and doesn't work at all on Windows (I'm using the JANSI library to get Windows color terminal support, as well). Another option that comes to mind is trying to call an external program to check whether a process called eclipse is running, but this is a dirty hack, and also has edge cases (color would disappear if someone was running the program in a terminal while also using Eclipse).

I even tried using reflection to find the OutputStream subclass that System.out is wrapping, assuming it might be different depending on the terminal type, but it's apparently a FileOutputStream no matter what.

Is there any less hackish way to determine whether a Java program is running in the built-in Eclipse console, or is this as hopeless as it sounds?

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I'm not sure if you can detect if ran in eclipse, but you can detect whether it is run as a jar or not. (Eclipse loads a folder as a classpath, not a jar file) Simply compare ClassName.class.getResource vs ClassName.class.getResourceAsStream. getResourceAsStream works in a jar or other environment, while getResource does not work in jars(I think).

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Of course, there is always the chance that users could be using it from within Eclipse, in which case the ANSI escape codes appear as garbage characters on the console.

Actually, it is more complicated than that.

The fact that stdout is "not Eclipse" does not guarantee that it will understand ANSI terminal codes. The output could be redirected to a file, or you may be talking to a remote console (or even a physical terminal / printer) that doesn't support ANSI.

I think your best bet is to make a "best guess" using the TERM environment variable, with a command line option (or a preference) to override this. Or don't bother with colourizing the console output at all.


Another possibility might be this: http://code.google.com/p/jlibs/wiki/AnsiColoring ... but I suspect that it is not going to work well enough across a wide range of OS platforms.

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