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I did some reading up on JLS 15.7.4 and 15.12.4.2, but it doesn't guarantee that there won't be any compiler/runtime optimization that would change the order in which method arguments are evaluated.

Assume the following code:

public static void main (String[] args) {
  MyObject obj = new MyObject();
  methodRelyingOnEvalOrder(obj, obj.myMethod());
}

public static Object methodRelyingOnEvalOrder(MyObject obj, Object input) {
  if (obj.myBoolean())
    return null;
  else
    return input;
}

Is it guaranteed that the compiler or runtime will not do a false optimization such as the following? This optimization may appear correct, but it is wrong when the order of evaluation matters.

In the case where calling obj.myMethod alters the value that will be returned by obj.myBoolean, it is crucial that obj.myMethod be called first as methodRelyingOnEvalOrder requires this alteration to happen first.

//*******************************
//Unwanted optimization possible:
//*******************************
public static void main (String[] args) {
  MyObject obj = new MyObject();
  methodRelyingOnEvalOrder(obj);
}

public static Object methodRelyingOnEvalOrder(MyObject obj) {
  if (obj.myBoolean())
    return null;
  else
    return obj.myMethod();
}
//*******************************

If possible, please show some sources or Java documentation that supports your answer.

Note: Please do not ask to rewrite the code. This is a specific case where I am questioning the evaluation order guarantee and the compiler/runtime optimization guarantee. The execution of obj.myMethod must happen in the main method.

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1  
You can sure the javac does almost no optimisations at all, it is all done by the JIT. While it may re-order or even eliminate the method call, the end behaviour should be the same. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 12 '13 at 7:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The bit of the JLS you referred to (15.7.4) does guarantee that:

Each argument expression appears to be fully evaluated before any part of any argument expression to its right.

and also in 15.12.4.2:

Evaluation then continues, using the argument values, as described below.

The "appears to" part allows for some optimization, but it must not be visible. The fact that all the arguments are evaluated before "evaluation then continues" shows that the arguments are really fully evaluted before the method executes. (Or at least, that's the visible result.)

So for example, if you had code of:

int x = 10;
foo(x + 5, x + 20);

it would be possible to optimize that to evaluate both x + 5 and x + 20 in parallel: there's no way you could detect this occurring.

But in the case you've given, you would be able to detect the call to obj.myMethod occurring after the call to obj.myBoolean(), so that wouldn't be a valid optimization at all.

In short: you're fine to assume that everything will execute in the obvious way here.

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Can you further explain what the JLS means by appears to be and why it is not is? And what does not being visible mean? –  ADTC Aug 12 '13 at 7:03
    
@ADTC: It means you won't be able to detect any optimization here - it's a truly invisible optimization, if any is applied. –  Jon Skeet Aug 12 '13 at 7:04
    
My gut agrees, but what that section actually says (the part you left out) is If the evaluation of any argument expression completes abruptly, then no part of any argument expression to its right appears to have been evaluated. It does not, at least from what I see in that section, explicitly specify what the apparent evaluation order should be if none of the evaluations complete abruptly. –  Jason C Aug 12 '13 at 7:06
1  
@JasonC: No, that's a different paragraph. The bit that I quoted does not depend on the bit you're quoting. Those are two independent guarantees. (Or rather, I'd say that the bit you're quoting just clarifies the bit I'm quoting in the case of an exception. It doesn't in any way say "the previous paragraph doesn't apply if no exceptions are thrown.") –  Jon Skeet Aug 12 '13 at 7:09
1  
@ADTC: As user2758929 pointed out in his answer, the "unwanted optimization" you proposed is not possible. If myMethod throws in your first example, myBoolean will never even be executed, as the argument evaluation must appear to happen first. –  Jason C Aug 12 '13 at 7:16

In addition to the argument evaluation order, the overview of the steps preformed when invoking a method, and their order, explained in section 15.12.4. Run-Time Evaluation of Method Invocation, makes it clear that all argument evaluations are performed before executing the method's code. Quote:

At run time, method invocation requires five steps. First, a target reference may be computed. Second, the argument expressions are evaluated. Third, the accessibility of the method to be invoked is checked. Fourth, the actual code for the method to be executed is located. Fifth, a new activation frame is created, synchronization is performed if necessary, and control is transferred to the method code.

The case you presented where an argument is only evaluated after control has been transferred to the method code is out of the question.

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Thanks for your contribution. I can only accept one answer, but I have upvoted you :) –  ADTC Aug 12 '13 at 7:16

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