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as a part of learning haskell i decided to implement an AVL tree. as of now, i only implemented insertion.

the implementation works, but it performs 3-4 times slower than a random java implementation i found for a random list of 9999999 random numbers.

it performs almost as well when given an input list of [1..9999999] or [9999999..1] (descending or ascending list), so i think the problem may lie in the rl and lr rolls

i would appreciate any hint about how to make it run faster.

yes, i know it looks kind of ugly.

data Tree a =   Empty |
                Branch {    key     :: a,
                            balance :: Int,
                            left    :: Tree a,
                            right   :: Tree a,
                            up      :: Bool    
                          --used internally to stop updating balance
                       }
                deriving (Eq)

leaf :: (Ord a, Eq a) => a -> Tree a
leaf x = Branch x 0 Empty Empty True

-- insert ------------------------------------
treeInsert :: (Eq a, Ord a) => Tree a -> a -> Tree a
treeInsert Empty x  = leaf x
treeInsert (Branch y b l r _) x 
  | x < y =
    let nl@(Branch _ _ _ _ nlu) = treeInsert l x   -- nl = new left
    in
      if nlu
        then if b==1  
               then roll $ Branch y  2      nl r False 
               else        Branch y (b + 1) nl r (b /= (-1)) 
        else               Branch y  b      nl r False
  | x > y = 
    let nr@(Branch _ _ _ _ nru) = treeInsert r x   -- nr = new right
    in
      if nru 
        then if b==(-1) 
               then roll $ Branch y (-2)    l nr False 
               else        Branch y (b - 1) l nr (b /= 1) 
        else               Branch y  b      l nr False
  | otherwise =            Branch x  b      l r  False

-- rolls -------------------------------------
roll :: (Eq a, Ord a) => Tree a -> Tree a
-- ll roll
roll (Branch y 2 (Branch ly 1 ll lr _) r _) = 
            Branch ly  0 ll (Branch y 0 lr r False) False
-- rr roll
roll (Branch y (-2) l (Branch ry (-1) rl rr _) _) = 
            Branch ry  0 (Branch y 0 l rl False) rr False
-- lr rolls
roll (Branch y 2 (Branch ly (-1) ll (Branch lry lrb lrl lrr _) _) r _) = 
   case lrb of 
     0  ->  Branch lry 0 (Branch ly 0   ll  lrl False) 
                         (Branch y  0   lrr r   False) False
     1  ->  Branch lry 0 (Branch ly 0   ll  lrl False) 
                         (Branch y (-1) lrr r   False) False
     (-1)-> Branch lry 0 (Branch ly 1   ll  lrl False) 
                         (Branch y  0   lrr r   False) False
-- rl rolls
roll (Branch y (-2) l (Branch ry 1 (Branch rly rlb rll rlr _) rr _) _) = 
   case rlb of 
     0  ->  Branch rly 0 (Branch y  0   l   rll False) 
                         (Branch ry 0   rlr rr  False) False
     1  ->  Branch rly 0 (Branch y  0   l   rll False) 
                         (Branch ry (-1) rlr rr False) False
     (-1)-> Branch rly 0 (Branch y  1   l   rll False) 
                         (Branch ry 0   rlr rr  False) False

-- construct a tree --------------------------
construct :: (Eq a, Ord a) => Tree a -> [a] -> Tree a
construct = foldl' treeInsert

-- rands -------------------------------------
rands :: Int -> Int -> Int -> Int -> [Int]
rands n low high seed = take n $ randomRs (low, high) (mkStdGen seed)

-- test run
main = do
    seed <- round `fmap` getPOSIXTime
    let ma = 9999999
    let t = construct Empty ( rands ma 1 ma seed ) 
    start <- getPOSIXTime
    end <- t `seq` getPOSIXTime
    print (end - start)
share|improve this question
    
How are you compiling the program, what flags? And which version of GHC please? –  Don Stewart Aug 12 '13 at 8:48
    
latest ghc, eclipsefp only put -wall in flags, didn't add any other. –  jajdoo Aug 12 '13 at 9:01
3  
It is possible, even likely, that the Java implementation you are comparing with has different functionality: namely, that it does not support sharing and instead mutates node values. It doesn't make much sense to compare appels and oranges, though. –  Ingo Aug 12 '13 at 9:07
2  
try codereview.stackexchange.com –  Will Ness Aug 12 '13 at 14:15
1  
@jajdoo - When you insert a value in your tree, you get a new tree, while keeping the old one (if you want). The new tree and the old tree share data, for example, the right branch, when your insert went to the left branch. While your java version (as I thought) mutates the tree. Hence you always have only one valid tree. In that case, the question of sharing is menaingless, of course. –  Ingo Aug 12 '13 at 16:29
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