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If an entity have more than one relationships and I try to insert simultaneously data on them, EF throws InvalidCastException.

As an example, imagine these domain classes:

public class Person : Entity<Guid>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public ICollection<Watch> Watches { get; set; }
    public ICollection<Shoe> Shoes { get; set; }
}

public class Shoe : Entity<Guid>
{
    public string Brand { get; set; }
}

public class Watch : Entity<Guid>
{
    public string Brand { get; set; }
}

Use case #1 (Works perfectly):

using (var context = new MultipleRelationshipsContext())
{
    var watches =
        new List<Watch>() {
            new Watch { Brand = "Rolex" }
        };

    context.Set<Person>().Add(
        new Person
        {
            Name = "Warren Buffett",
            Watches = watches
        }
    );
}

Use case #2 (Works perfectly too):

using (var context = new MultipleRelationshipsContext())
{
    var shoes =
        new List<Shoe>() {
            new Shoe { Brand = "Cole Haan" }
        };

    context.Set<Person>().Add(
        new Person
        {
            Name = "Barack Obama",
            Shoes = shoes
        }
    );
}

Use case #3 (InvalidCastException):

using (var context = new MultipleRelationshipsContext())
{
    var watches =
        new List<Watch>() {
            new Watch { Brand = "Casio" }
        };

    var shoes =
        new List<Shoe>() {
            new Shoe { Brand = "New Balance" }
        };

    context.Set<Person>().Add(
        new Person
        {
            Name = "Steve Jobs",
            Watches = watches,
            Shoes = shoes
        }
    );
}

In the third case, an InvalidCastException is thrown saying that EF cannot cast from 'EntityFrameworkMultipleRelationships.Entities.Watch to 'EntityFrameworkMultipleRelationships.Entities.Shoe'.

I'm a EF newbie, but I think that something wrong is going on here.

I would apprecciate any hint to point out a possible solution!

PD.: In order to test yourself as fast as possible, download this VS2012 solution: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/22887057/EntityFrameworkMultipleRelationships.zip. Follow README.txt to create a database following code-first pattern.

UPDATE

As @Chris pointed out, the problem was that EF considers Shoe and Watch entities being the same. This was caused by a bad implemented overriden Equals. This is actually the source of the problems:

public abstract class Entity<T>
{
    [Key, DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
    [Column("Id")]
    public T Id { get; set; }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        Entity<T> entityOfT = obj as Entity<T>;
        if (entityOfT == null)
            return false;

        return object.Equals(this.Id, entityOfT.Id);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return this.Id.GetHashCode();
    }
}

If two different entity types (like Watch and Shoe) have the same Id, EF is considering them equals.

Adding a runtime type checking to overriden Equals takes into account entity type and therefore solves this issue.

...
return this.GetType() == entityOfT.GetType() && object.Equals(this.Id, entityOfT.Id);
...
share|improve this question
    
does this work context.Set<Person>().Add( new Person { Name = "Steve Jobs", Watches = watches } ); –  Ehsan Aug 12 '13 at 8:43
1  
Of course it does, it is the same case as #1. –  Gorka Lerchundi Osa Aug 12 '13 at 9:19
    
Did you get this fixed? I am facing similar issue, only it's giving an error where I've a a table split in to two classes (domain entities) and the error says that it can't cast one to the other. stackoverflow.com/questions/19391238/… –  Brikesh Kumar Oct 15 '13 at 21:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure of the Entity Framework internals (although I might try and have a look after this), but I think you problem is a possible combination of two things:

1) The way the Entity Framework auto generates the Sets which store your entities.

2) You've got two child objects with the same Guid, which will return Equals(..) true, even though they're of different type.

Your code will run if you either:

Define either Shoe/Watch (or both), and add it/them to the corresponding set(s):

context.Set<Shoe>().Add(aShoe);

Or Define a different value for the Guid for a Watch or Shoe

Watch tWatch = new Watch { Brand = "Casio", Id = new System.Guid("00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000001") };

If you don't do either of those, and you follow your third example, you can follow the debugger through and find that you'll reach a point where Equals is called with a Watch and Shoe, and the result is true - I assume that's the point at which Entity Framework throws your exception.

Hopefully someone who understands a bit more about the EF internals will be able to point out why that's the case.

share|improve this answer

Not sure why that particular error is thrown, but EF seems to be getting confused due to your Entity.Id definition. If you move the PK field to the Shoe and Watch class definitions, it works. Also, if you add the watch and shoe objects to their respective DbContext sets prior to adding them via the collections to the Person object it also works. In any case, being slightly more explicit one way or the other solves the problem.

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