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A few days ago I put a question on SO, without any meaningful answer. Bellow is it on short:

I have a client server program in C that encrypts/decrypts data with mcrypt C's library. The client encrypts the string that wants to send to server, send it, and after the server reads, decrypts it. Bellow are my encrypt and decrypt function:

encrypt function:

void encrypt(char *es, char *key, char *civ, size_t  length) {

    MCRYPT td;
    int n;

    td = mcrypt_module_open(MCRYPT_TWOFISH, NULL, MCRYPT_CFB, NULL );
    if (td == MCRYPT_FAILED) {
        log_err(log_opts, strerror(errno));
        exit(1);
    }
    n = mcrypt_enc_get_iv_size(td);

    char iv[n + 1];
    strncpy(iv, civ, n);
    iv[n] = '\0';

    if ((mcrypt_generic_init(td, key, KEY_SIZE, iv)) < 0) {
        log_err(log_opts, "while trying to do mcrypt_generic_init.");
        exit(1);
    }
    mcrypt_generic(td, es, length);

    if (mcrypt_module_close(td) < 0) {
        log_err(log_opts, "while trying to close module.");
        exit(1);
    }

}

decrypt function

void decrypt(char *ds, char *key, char *civ, size_t length) {
    MCRYPT td;
    int n;

    td = mcrypt_module_open(MCRYPT_TWOFISH, NULL, MCRYPT_CFB, NULL );
    n = mcrypt_enc_get_iv_size(td);

    char iv[n + 1];
    strncpy(iv, civ, n);
    iv[n] = '\0';

    if ((mcrypt_generic_init(td, key, KEY_SIZE, iv)) < 0) {
        log_err(log_opts, "trying to do mcrypt_generic_init.");
        exit(1);
    }

    mdecrypt_generic(td, ds, length);
    if (mcrypt_module_close(td) < 0) {
        log_err(log_opts, "while trying to close module.");
        exit(1);
    }

}

My problem:

There are cases (1 to 10 rate) when a string decrypted on server side but encrypted on client side is not the same like original. Can anyone suggest my where the problem can come from?

Now, I managed to catch a scenario when I'm getting the above bad behavior that I already described. Bellow is my main function:

int main(void) {

    char *newKey = "P1adEfRuPX0AP2UDmSWHhgS6DaIrE4eb5EEJudC";
    char *iv = "asdfkSSDFAEGasld3G9dkDF0";
    char *s1 = "XZH9ZYKQC9*NYSR6UDUII";
    char *s2 = malloc(STRING_SIZE * sizeof(char));

    strcpy(s2, s1);
    printf("%s - %s\n", s1, s2);

    encrypt(s2, newKey, iv, strlen(s2));
    decrypt(s2, newKey, iv, strlen(s2));

    if (strncmp(s1, s2, STRING_SIZE) != 0)
        printf("wrong encrypt-decrypt: %s %s\n", s1, s2);

    exit(0);

}

Bellow is the output from that main function:

XZH9ZYKQC9*NYSR6UDUII - XZH9ZYKQC9*NYSR6UDUII
wrong encrypt-decrypt: XZH9ZYKQC9*NYSR6UDUII XZH9ZYKQC

Question: Am I doing something wrong, or is that library problematic?

share|improve this question
    
What is STRING_SIZE? –  ouah Aug 12 '13 at 8:59
    
@ouah the STRING_SIZE is 40. –  artaxerxe Aug 12 '13 at 9:00
    
And KEY_SIZE? Your program is incomplete, please provide all the missing informations. –  ouah Aug 12 '13 at 9:13
    
@ouah the KEY_SIZE is 16. –  artaxerxe Aug 12 '13 at 9:22
1  
I will note that it's a bug to use strncpy on raw binary data like encryption keys, IVs, and ciphertexts; these may perfectly legitimately contain '\0'. Use memcpy instead. I don't think this is what's causing the issue here, though. –  chrylis Aug 12 '13 at 10:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Finally, I figured out where the problem comes from. In main function, I have two lines:

encrypt(s2, newKey, iv, strlen(s2));
decrypt(s2, newKey, iv, strlen(s2));

The first line is ok, as long as s2 is a well defined string of char. But in the second line, strlen(s2) can return an erroneous result if the resulted encrypted text contains '\0''s in it.

I just want to say that @chrylis' comment gave me a hint where to search for problem.

In the end, as a rule of thumb, I would say: IN C, YOU MUST NOT USE STRING'S FUNCTIONS ON ENCRYPTED TEXT.

Thanks to all for assistance!

share|improve this answer
2  
More accurately, you must not use string functions on things that don't conform to C's definition of "string". (Such as, yes, arbitrary output of an encryption process.) –  Elchonon Edelson Aug 15 '13 at 0:50

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