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Please do not confuse this with 'selecting code' like selecting code with a mouse.

When my debug device hits a break point I want to highlight the specific line of code. I am using the CDT Plugin.

I already got the lineNumber and all I want to do now is to tell

editor.highlightLine(lineNumber);

to get something like this:

enter image description here

I already tried this:

      marker = resource.createMarker(IMarker.TEXT);
      marker.setAttribute(IMarker.LINE_NUMBER, 10);
      marker.setAttribute(IMarker.CHAR_START, 0);
      marker.setAttribute(IMarker.CHAR_END, 10);

but it didn't work.

Since there are already predefined annotations provided by Eclipse and/or the CDT Plugin I'd like to reuse them. But how to access and use them inside sourcecode?

enter image description here

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what is the editor you are using? is it default eclipse editor? means in your code editor.highlightline(lineNumber);, here "editor" is what? eclipse default editor? –  Jayaprasad Aug 12 '13 at 9:55
    
I am using the CEditor from the CDT plugin which extends TextEditor –  Stefan Falk Aug 12 '13 at 9:59
    
Check for selectAndReveal(int, int) is present in CDT plugin editor? this methos is used to highlight a line in TextEditor of eclipse!! –  Jayaprasad Aug 12 '13 at 10:02
    
Have you checked your colors? It might be there but invisible –  Lai Aug 12 '13 at 10:02
    
@Lai How could I set the color? –  Stefan Falk Aug 12 '13 at 11:51

2 Answers 2

You can create your own marker using an extension point "org.eclipse.core.resources.markers" and adding super attribute of type "org.eclipse.core.resources.textmarker". After setting up your marker, you still need to describe its look and feel by adding the annotation extension point "org.eclipse.ui.editors.annotationTypes"

I am not exactly sure of your intentions but this link might help http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/tutorials/os-eclipse-plugin-guide/section3.html

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Well.. this does not make sense to me. What is the CDT Plugin good for if I have to reinvent the wheel after all? I mean .. all this is here that one can visualize the debugging process more easily.. how can it be that such a basic thing like highlighting a single line demands so much effort? –  Stefan Falk Aug 12 '13 at 13:10

Marker is the thing on your ruler. You need to look at the editor background painting. Take a look at InstructionPointerManager.java

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I see that this class is internal. I assume I have to write my own InstructionPointerManager? This looks quite helpful. I will not forget to mark your answer if it works. –  Stefan Falk Aug 13 '13 at 8:01
    
But you're sure that there is no easier way to do this even though I am using the CDT Plugin already with my Eclipse Application? This plugin should alreads support this behaviour.. –  Stefan Falk Aug 13 '13 at 8:07
1  
I am not sure if there is no other simpler way. CDT has 2 debug frameworks (CDI and DSF) and this class is a part of DSF. My understanding is that whenever you write your debugger you need to implement something like this. –  Eugene Aug 13 '13 at 15:42
    
Here comments.gmane.org/gmane.comp.ide.eclipse.cdt.devel/16070 it says, that the DSF approach shall be used. But I got a few things running with this approach eclipse.org/articles/Article-Debugger/how-to.html It seems like that there is no uniform way for this. Maybe I'm wrong but I think the community should take a few steps back and reconsider their design at this point. –  Stefan Falk Aug 13 '13 at 15:49

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