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I need to ensure only 1 instance of my C++ application is running.

Using the Win API how do I;

  1. retrieve the information about my current application? GetCurrentProcess() will give me a HANDLE on my application, how do I retrieve information about it

  2. retrieve a list of all running processes for the user? EnumProcesses() gives a list, but appears to require a pre-allocated buffer, so how do I find out how many processes are currently running?

  3. I need to compare the exe name of my server to the running processes, and raise an error if I find more than one

Note: I cannot use any boost libraries, and I am not interested in using a mutex, seen on similar posts.

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3  
"I am not interested in using a mutex".... but why? –  Nawaz Aug 12 '13 at 10:01
    
It would take too long to explain why, but I need a non-mutex solution. –  Marcus MacWilliam Aug 12 '13 at 10:29
1  
Use Event then, or any shared object approach. –  Nawaz Aug 12 '13 at 10:30
5  
"How do I make a chocolate cake without using chocolate?" - That's... challenging. –  IInspectable Aug 12 '13 at 11:10
    
Well, ingredient substitution is a valid question on Seasoned Chefs (the cooking StackExchange), so why not here? ;) Of course, the same proviso applies: state the underlying reason, so our substitutions don't run foul of the same problem. –  MSalters Aug 12 '13 at 11:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use the CreateMutex function to create a system-wide named mutex to denote whether your process is running. It will return ERROR_ALREADY_EXISTS if the process is already running:

 (void)::CreateMutex( NULL,
                      TRUE,
                      TEXT( "My_Special_Invokation_Test_Mutex" ) );
 switch ( ::GetLastError() ) {
     case ERROR_SUCCESS:
         // Process was not running already
         break;
     case ERROR_ALREADY_EXISTS:
         // Process is running already
         break;
     default:
         // Error occured, not sure whether process is running already.
         break;
 }

Now, if you insist on not using a mutex, you can use the CreateFile function instead. Make sure to pass zero for the dwShareMode field to get exclusive access semantics, CREATE_NEW for the dwCreationDisposition field (so that you create the file only if it doesn't exist already) and FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE for the dwFlagsAndAttributes argument so that the file gets deleted once your process is terminated. Something like this:

LPCTSTR lockFileName = ...;
(void)::CreateFile( lockFileName,
                    GENERIC_READ,
                    0,
                    NULL,
                    CREATE_NEW,
                    FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE,
                    NULL );
switch ( ::GetLastError() ) {
     case ERROR_SUCCESS:
         // Process was not running already
         break;
     case ERROR_FILE_EXISTS:
         // Process is running already
         break;
     default:
         // Error occured, not sure whether process is running already.
         break;
}

See this article about Temporary file generation and usage best practices about how to deal with temporary files safely.

To make a long story short, it's certainly possible to use lock files for your task, but I think it's harder to do it right.

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1  
+1 for better (and correct) solution than mine. –  Nawaz Aug 12 '13 at 10:04
    
OK, I did add the comment that I am not interested in using a mutex. –  Marcus MacWilliam Aug 12 '13 at 10:24
    
@MarcusMacWilliam: Sorry, I overread that bit. I now expanded my answer to discuss a CreateFile based solution (but note that it's substantially harder to get that one right). –  Frerich Raabe Aug 12 '13 at 10:47

Updated version of Nawaz's answer:-

Handle mutex = CreateMutex (0, 0, "SomeUniqueName");

switch (GetLastError ())
{
case ERROR_ALREADY_EXISTS:
  // app already running
  break;

case ERROR_SUCCESS:
  // first instance
  break;

default:
  // who knows what happened!
  break;
}

This does have a security issue, a malicious application could create a mutex called "SomeUniqueName" before your app starts, which would then prevent your app from being run. To counter this, you can name the mutex based on a hash of some constant system parameter (the MAC address for example). The MSDN documentation has this to say about single instance applications:

If you are using a named mutex to limit your application to a single instance, a malicious user can create this mutex before you do and prevent your application from starting. To prevent this situation, create a randomly named mutex and store the name so that it can only be obtained by an authorized user. Alternatively, you can use a file for this purpose. To limit your application to one instance per user, create a locked file in the user's profile directory.

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Again, I am not interested in using a mutex. –  Marcus MacWilliam Aug 12 '13 at 10:24
    
Should the mutex handle be closed with CloseHandle() when the appication is closing down? –  Marcus MacWilliam Aug 12 '13 at 10:49
    
@MarcusMacWilliam: You certainly don't want to close the mutex handle yourself. The operanting system will do that for you as your process closes, hence the mutex will get destroyed when your process closes - which is exactly what you want. If you call CloseHandle yourself, there's definately a phase where your process is still running (right after CloseHandle returns) but the process will be considered "not running" by possible concurrent invocations. –  Frerich Raabe Aug 12 '13 at 10:57

Since mutex isn't desired, you can for example use a file mapping instead. The documentation to CreateFilemapping says:

If the object exists before the function call, the function returns a handle to the existing object (with its current size, not the specified size), and GetLastError returns ERROR_ALREADY_EXISTS. If the function fails, the return value is NULL.

This leads to the following no-mutex implementation:

Handle h = CreateFileMapping(0, 0, PAGE_READONLY, 0, 4096, name);
bool already_running = !!h && (GetLastError() == ERROR_ALREADY_EXISTS);

Either the call succeeds and the mapping already exists, then another process is already running.

Or, a new mapping is created, or the call fails. In either case, no other process is already running. If the call fails, it almost certainly failed for any other process that may have tried before as well. Since once a call was successful, the mapping already exists, the only possible reason why two identical calls could succeed once and then fail would be "no more handles left", and that just doesn't (well, shouldn't) happen. Anyway, if this does happen, you have a much more serious problem elsewhere.

That thing probably works with every type of named kernel object you pick (i.e. every type of kernel object that has both a Create and an Open version).

A file mapping object has the advantage that if you also want to do IPC (say, forward your commandline to the already running instance, and then exit), then you already have a mapping that you can use (though sure enough a pipe would do mighty fine as well).

But otherwise, I don't see how this (or any other solution) is superior to using the mutex approach in any way. Really, why not use a mutex? It's what they're for.

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