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I want to make the last/third div to be filled the whole remaining space. I given the 100% height but there is scroll bar is coming, which i dont want to show. I there any CSS solution for same. if not possible from css then the jQuery/JS solution will be fine.

<html style="height:100%">
<head>
    <style type="css">
    	html , body {
    		width:100%; height:100%;
    		padding:0px;
    		margin:0px;
    	}
    </style>
</head>
<body style="height:100%;padding:0px;margin:0px;">
    <div style="height:100%;width:100%">
    	<div style="height:100px;background-color:#ddd">&nbsp;</div>
    	<div style="height:25px;background-color:#eee">&nbsp;</div>
    	<div style="display:block;height:100%;background-color:#ccc">&nbsp;</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
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if it is already expanding and you dont want the scroll why not just set height to 90% for example. –  Drevak Nov 30 '09 at 8:26
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12 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

In jQuery, you can try something like this:

$(function() {
    $(window).resize(function() {
        $('div:last').height($(window).height() - $('div:last').offset().top);
    });
    $(window).resize();
});

Whenever the window is resized, the last div's height is modified so that the div extends to the bottom of the page. Window's resize method is called on page load so that the div is resized immediately.

If you substract the top offset of the div from the height of the window, you are left with the maximum height available. If you have margins, borders of padding applied, you might have to adjust the value which is substracted, for example:

$('div:last').height($(window).height() - $('div:last').offset().top - 30);

Assuming you want the div 30px from the bottom of the window.

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does not work in IE7? –  Josef Sábl Jun 30 '10 at 14:08
6  
This minor tweak will include padding/margin for the div, instead of requiring hard coding: $('div:last').height($(window).height() - $('div:last').offset().top - ($('div:last').outerHeight(true) - $('div:last').height())); –  AaronSieb Jul 29 '10 at 15:02
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On modern browsers: set position: relative on the container div, position: absolute on the third div. Then you can position it to the top and bottom of the container the same time: top: 0px, bottom: 0px;

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Using this though, the inner div won't expand if there's a bunch of content in it will it? –  Matthew Scharley Nov 30 '09 at 8:29
    
Yes, it will expand. –  Joó Ádám Nov 30 '09 at 10:20
    
Great solution. Worked as intended here. –  artur Feb 5 '10 at 21:23
    
Not really works, as this would give the third div 100% height, and make it overlap the first two divs. It doesn't give the third div the remaining space. –  sereda Aug 6 '10 at 15:19
    
Doesn't work for me in Chrome 27 on Mac OSX 10.8 –  pennstate_fanboy Jun 24 '13 at 13:26
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You could also use faux columns by adding a vertically repeating background image to the CSS making the columns appear toy the space - this gives the appear. You could add this image to the div that wraps the three columns or to the body tag.

If these columns a going to have content in them it's probably worth adding some as the columns will behave differently.

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You can hide the overflow in the containing DIV:

<html>
<head>
    <style>
        *{margin:0;padding:0;}
        html,body{height:100%;}
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div style="overflow:hidden;height:100%">
        <div style="height:100px;background-color:#ddd"></div>
        <div style="height:25px;background-color:#eee"></div>
        <div style="height:100%;background-color:#ccc">&nbsp;</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

Note that content might dissapear when resizing the window using this technique.

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If content Increases then the its hidden. –  Wasim Shaikh Nov 30 '09 at 13:25
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You can use pure CSS height:100% (where 100% is the height of the visible area in the window) values in quirks mode by not using DOCTYPE at all or using IE-faulty HTML 4.0 DOCTYPE (without the .dtd url)

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<body style="margin:0; padding:0; overflow:hidden;">
<div style="height: 100%; background: red"></div>
</body>
</html>

You can ditch the <!DOCTYPE.. entirely, it still would have the same effect. overflow:hidden declaration in body style is to get rid of the empty scrollbar in IE. But remember - this is quirks mode which means that you are on unpredictable territory, CSS box model differs from browser to browser!

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html style="height:100%">
<head>
    <style type="css">
        html , body {
                width:100%; 
                height:100%;
                padding:0px;
                margin:0px;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body style="height:100%;padding:0px;margin:0px;">
    <div style="height:100%;">
        <div style="height:100px;background-color:#ddd">&nbsp;</div>
        <div style="height:25px;background-color:#eee">&nbsp;</div>
        <div style="position:fixed;top:125px;height:100%;width:100%;background-color:#ccc">&nbsp;</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

Perhaps this could work?! But I don't know whats happens if there is to mutch text...

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Simply don't worry about it if your goal is to have the colour fill the bottom.

Set the colour of the outer div, and let the third one resize its height however it wants as content goes in.

<html style="height:100%">
<head>
    <style type="css">
        html , body {
                width:100%; height:100%;
                padding:0px;
                margin:0px;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body style="height:100%;padding:0px;margin:0px;">
    <div style="height:100%;width:100%;background-color:#ccc">
        <div style="height:100px;background-color:#ddd">&nbsp;</div>
        <div style="height:25px;background-color:#eee">&nbsp;</div>
        <div style="">&nbsp;</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
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The property 'height: 100%;' will instruct browsers to take the 100 per cent of the available screen space for that particular div, which means that your browser will check the browsing space size and return it to the CSS engine without checking whether there are any elements inside it.

The only workaround that I see to fit here is to use the solution provided by David to use 'position: absolute; bottom: 0;' for that div.

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it a bit ugly, but it works..

 <html style="height:100%">
    <head>
    	<style type="css">
    		html , body {
        			width:100%;
        			height:100%;
        			padding:0px;
        			margin:0px;
    		}
    	</style>
    </head>
    <body style="height:100%;padding:0px;margin:0px;">
    	<div style="width:100%;height:100%;">
    		<div style="width:100%;height:100px;background-color:#ddd;">&nbsp;</div>
    		<div style="width:100%;height:25px;background-color:#eee;">&nbsp;</div>
    		<div style="width:100%;height:100%;background-color:#ccc;margin-bottom:-1000em;padding-bottom:1000em;">&nbsp;</div>
    	</div>
    </body>
 </html>
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Here's a litle jquery fix I have done:

<html>
<head>
<title>test</title>
<script src="jquery-1.3.2.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function() {
        var heightToFill = $("#parentDiv").height() - $("#firstDiv").height() - $("#secondDiv").height();
        $("#thirdDiv").height(heightToFill);
    });
</script>
</head>
<body style="height: 100%; padding: 0px; margin: 0px;">
<div id="parentDiv" style="height: 100%; width: 100%; position:absolute;">
    <div id="firstDiv" style="height: 100px; background-color: #ddd">
        &nbsp;</div>
    <div id="secondDiv" style="height: 25px; background-color: #eee">
        &nbsp;</div>
    <div id="thirdDiv" style="background-color: #ccc;">
        &nbsp;a</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
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This initializes the div's height when the page loads. You may also need to add Tatu Ulmanen's code so the div's dimension will be changed after every window resize. –  Jronny Dec 1 '09 at 2:47
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$(window).resize(function(){
        $('.elastic').each(function(i,n){
        var ph = $(this).parent().height();
        var pw = $(this).parent().width();
        var sh = 0; 
        var s = $(this).siblings().each(function(i,n){
            sh += $(this).height();
        })
        $(this).height(ph-sh);
        sh = 0, ph = 0, s=0;

    }); 
});

put the following on on your script tag or external javascript. then change  

when you resize the window... it will automatically fit its height to available space on the bottom. you could have as many divs as you like however you can only have one elastic inside that parent. couldnt be bothered to calculate multiple elastics :) hope it helps

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Works great although I did need to use outerHeight/outerWidth instead of regular height/width. –  Jamie Mar 10 '11 at 23:14
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$(document).ready(function() {
    var heightToFill = $("#parentDiv").height() - $("#firstDiv").height() - $("#secondDiv").height();
    $("#thirdDiv").height(heightToFill);

    $(window).resize(function(){  var heightToFill = $("#parentDiv").height() - $("#firstDiv").height() - $("#secondDiv").height();
    $("#thirdDiv").height(heightToFill);
});

This should be included in case the browser is resized....

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