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If I have code that looks like this:

(apply + 0
   [1 2 3 4])

and I put it through the reader, it becomes

(apply + 0 [1 2 3 4]) and the formatting (the carriage return and the spacing) is lost

Is there anyway to save the formatting of the code when it is read?


for example:

(fact [{:type :section
        :title "Normal Operation"
        :tag "normal-operation"}]

  "The most straightforward code is one where no issues raised. This
   can be seen in Example {{ribol-normal-eq}} below:"

  [{:type :image :href "ribol-normal.png"}]

  [[{:tag "ribol-normal-eq"}]]
  (manage                          ;; L2
   [1 2 (manage 3)])               ;; L1 and L0
  => [1 2 3]

is transformed to:

1 - Normal Operation

The most straightforward code is one where no issues raised. This can be seen in Example 1.1 below:

[[ribol-normal.png]]

1.1

(manage                          ;; L2
   [1 2 (manage 3)])             ;; L1 and L0

=> [1 2 3]
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2 Answers 2

Use clojure.pprint/write with code-dispatch.

(clojure.pprint/write
  '(apply + 0 [1 2 3 4])
  :dispatch clojure.pprint/code-dispatch)

It won't give you the indentation you desire, because the apply form is too short and because your line-break only for the last argument is quite arbitrary. However if you want to print Clojure code, this is the right thing to do. It will correctly print let- and various other forms.

Here is an example with a longer form

(clojure.pprint/write
  '(defn plugin
     "A leiningen plugin project template."
     [name]
     (let [render (renderer "plugin")
           unprefixed (if (.startsWith name "lein-")
                        (subs name 5)
                        name)
           data {:name name,
                 :unprefixed-name unprefixed,
                 :sanitized (sanitize unprefixed),
                 :year (year)}]
       (main/info
         (str "Generating a fresh Leiningen plugin called " name "."))
       (->files
         data
         ["project.clj" (render "project.clj" data)]
         ["README.md" (render "README.md" data)]
         [".gitignore" (render "gitignore" data)]
         ["src/leiningen/{{sanitized}}.clj" (render "name.clj" data)]
         ["LICENSE" (render "LICENSE" data)])))
  :dispatch
  clojure.pprint/code-dispatch)

=>

(defn plugin
  "A leiningen plugin project template."
  [name]
  (let [render (renderer "plugin")
        unprefixed (if (.startsWith name "lein-") (subs name 5) name)
        data {:name name,
              :unprefixed-name unprefixed,
              :sanitized (sanitize unprefixed),
              :year (year)}]
    (main/info
      (str "Generating a fresh Leiningen plugin called " name "."))
    (->files
      data
      ["project.clj" (render "project.clj" data)]
      ["README.md" (render "README.md" data)]
      [".gitignore" (render "gitignore" data)]
      ["src/leiningen/{{sanitized}}.clj" (render "name.clj" data)]
      ["LICENSE" (render "LICENSE" data)])))
share|improve this answer
    
hmmm... its not quite what I want... because it needs to print arbitrary breaks but thats a really useful. Thanks! –  zcaudate Aug 12 '13 at 12:10
    
If you want to print arbitrary breaks you need to pass an indented string. The reader will take your apply form as a list and print it as such. –  Leon Grapenthin Aug 12 '13 at 12:16
    
can you put in an example? –  zcaudate Aug 12 '13 at 12:30
    
What exactly is your input source? A form or a string? The point is, if you are using read, your string will be read as an object, a list in your case (type (with-in-str "(apply + 0 [1 2 3 4])" (read))) => clojure.lang.PersistentList. A list obv. won't have indentation or line-breaks. –  Leon Grapenthin Aug 12 '13 at 12:37
    
see updated question for motivation. the main thing I'm stuck on is how to grab the code without loosing the formating or the comments –  zcaudate Aug 12 '13 at 12:55

sjacket is a first step into that direction. But it's still quite early in its development.

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