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In the answers to this question, we read that function f() {} defines the name locally, while [var] f = function() {} defines it globally. That makes perfect sense to me, but there's some strange behavior that's different between the two declarations.

I made an HTML page with the script

onload = function() {
    alert("hello");
}

and it worked as expected. When I changed it to

function onload() {
    alert("hello");
}

nothing happened. (Firefox still fired the event, but WebKit, Opera, and Internet Explorer didn't, although frankly I've no idea which is correct.)

In both cases (in all browsers), I could verify that both window.onload and onload were set to the function. In both cases, the global object this is set to the window, and I no matter how I write the declaration, the window object is receiving the property just fine.

What's going on here? Why does one declaration work differently from the other? Is this a quirk of the JavaScript language, the DOM, or the interaction between the two?

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1  
I'm beginning to suspect this is a bug in Webkit/Opera and that Firefox has the correct behaviour. –  Wogan Nov 30 '09 at 9:27
    
Neither is correct per se. The global object (to which window refers) may have host defined properties (such as onload) and an ECMAScript 3 implementation is free to implement the behaviour of such a property as it sees fit, including the internal [[Put]] method that is called when the value of the property is assigned. –  Tim Down Nov 30 '09 at 9:58
    
In Firefox 3.5.5, I see the alert if I use onload = function() {...}; but not with var onload = function() {...}; –  Tim Down Nov 30 '09 at 10:09
2  
I'm not sure about a miracle, but based on the observed inconsistencies I'd certainly recommend against using the var onload = ... and function onload() {...} forms. window.onload = function() {...}; is not part of any current standard but pretty universally much supported across browsers, as is <body onload="...">. A combination of window.addEventListener and window.attachEvent will allow you to add multiple event handlers in all the major browsers, but beware of differences between the two. –  Tim Down Nov 30 '09 at 10:32
2  
This is unrelated to your problem, but you might be interested to know why it's a good idea to avoid onload = function(){...} pattern — thinkweb2.com/projects/prototype/… –  kangax Dec 11 '09 at 15:44
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This two snippets declares a function in the current scope, named "onload". No binding is done.

function onload() { ... }

.

var onload = function() { ... }

This snippet assigns a function to a property/variable/field named "onload" on the current scope:

onload = function() { ... }

The reason why Firefox performed the binding and raised the onload event on the 1st snippet and the others didn't might be because the Firefox chrome itself is written and automated using JavaScript - that's why it's so flexible and easy to write extensions on it. Somehow, when you declared the locally-scoped onload function that way, Firefox "replaced" the window's (most likely the local context at the time) implementation of onload (at that time, an empty function or undefined), when the other browsers correctly "sandboxed" the declaration into another scope (say, global or something).

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Good observation that Firefox is written in JavaScript. –  Josh Lee Apr 7 '10 at 23:44
1  
Well, not completely, but most of his chrome (user interface) is. –  Fábio Batista Apr 8 '10 at 0:00
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Many people are correctly pointing out the global / local difference between (UPDATE: Those answers have mostly been removed by their authors now)

var x = function() {

and

function x() {

But that doesn't actually answer your specific question as you aren't actually doing the first one of these.

The difference between the two in your example is:

// Adds a function to the onload event
onload = function() {
    alert("hello");
}

Whereas

// Declares a new function called "onload"
function onload() {
    alert("hello");
}
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Maybe it's because the latter gets evaluated at parse time, so the window object isn't quite ready to accept events yet? –  Josh Lee Nov 30 '09 at 8:41
    
Declaring a function called "onload" doesn't explicitly bind it to the onload event - so you would still need to tell browsers to call the function "onload" when the event "onload" fires (although some may assume to do so). –  Steve Fenton Nov 30 '09 at 8:44
    
Really? Assigning a function to window.onload works well in my experience. –  Josh Lee Nov 30 '09 at 8:45
2  
According to the ECMAScript 3 spec, var x = function() {...}; and function x() {...} should set properties of the same variable object, which in the case of global code is the global object, which is more or less equivalent to window in most browsers, so your answer doesn't really answer the question. –  Tim Down Nov 30 '09 at 10:44
1  
@Sohnee: my point was that there is no "global / local difference" between var x = function() {...}; and function x() {...} declared in the same scope. –  Tim Down Dec 8 '09 at 12:14
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Here's what I think is going on, based on Tim Down's helpful comments and a brief discussion with Jonathan Penn:

When the JavaScript interpreter assigns to the window.onload property, it's talking to an object that the browser has given it. The setter that it invokes notices that the property is called onload, and so goes off to the rest of the browser and wires up the appropriate event. All of this is outside the scope of JavaScript — the script just sees that the property has been set.

When you write a declaration function onload() {}, the setter doesn't get called in quite the same way. Since the declaration causes an assignment to happen at parse time, not evaluation time, the script interpreter goes ahead and creates the variable without telling the browser; or else the window object isn't ready to receive events. Whatever it is, the browser doesn't get a chance to see the assignment like it does when you write onload = function() {}, which goes through the normal setter routine.

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The simplest explanation:

function aaaaaaa(){

Can be used before it is declarated:

aaaaaaa();
function aaaaaaa(){

}

But this doesn't work:

aaaaaaa();
aaaaaaa=function(){

}

That's because in the third code, you are assigning aaaaaaa to an anonymous function, not declaring it as a function.

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This generates an error:

foo();
var foo = function(){};

This doesn't:

foo();
function foo(){}

The second syntax is therefore nicer when you're using functions to modularize and organize your code, whereas the first syntax is nicer for the functions-as-data paradigm.

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var onload = function() {
    alert("hello");
}

Will declare it locally too.

I suggest you to read this very helpful article : http://kangax.github.io/nfe/

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1  
That's a great article, but it doesn't answer the question. –  Josh Lee Nov 30 '09 at 8:39
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