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I need to detect which word I need to display that is correspond to the user score.

I have next switch:

switch (score) {
        case 0:
            outString = @"String1";
            break;
        case 1:
            outString = @"String2";
            break;
        case 2:
            outString = @"String3";
            break;
        case 3:
            outString = @"String3";
            break;
        case 4:
            outString = @"String3";
            break;
        case 5:
            outString = @"String1";
            break;
        case 6:
            outString = @"String1";
            break;
        case 7:
            outString = @"String1";
            break;
        case 8:
            outString = @"String1";
            break;
        case 9:
            outString = @"String1";
            break;           

        default:
            break;
    }

But, how I can use the same switch when score will be 29 or 109. So I need to trim in the first case 20 to get 9 and in the second case I need to trim 100 to get 9.

I used this algorithm before, but I forgot how to :(

So the goals is next - I every time need just number from 0 - 9 without tenths hundredths thousandths numbers.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If your word always depends on last digit of number, you can simply use it in switch condition (using modulus operator):

switch (score % 10)
   ...

If only 29 and 129 are special cases then you can use multiple labels for the same case:

case 9:
case 29:
case 109:
        outString = @"String1";
        break;
share|improve this answer

Much better than to use a giant switch statement, is to use a lookup table:

std::string score_string(unsigned int score)
{
    static const std::string strings = {"String1","String2","String3",...};
    static const int strings_count = 10; //10 strings in the lookup table, for example.

    return strings[score % strings_count];
}
share|improve this answer
    
The downside of this example is that it will crash for scores out of range. A switch may detect errors on default case. You might perhaps achieve that in this your example as well with a range check. I would also prefer static const char* as I am hoping it will be a compile time constant. –  user2672165 Aug 12 '13 at 11:57
1  
not in this case because the default statement in the switch with the score%10 cannot be reached –  hl037_ Aug 12 '13 at 12:19
    
@user2672165 First: There is no buffer overflow because we use the score modulo the lenght of the table as index. Second: String literals have static storage, exactly as static local variables of a function. So there is no benefit to use const char* instead of std::string. en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/string_literal In fact, there is a performance penalty if you use const char*: The function returns a std::string, so using a C-string results in calling the constructor of std::string in the return statement. If you use std::string, ... –  Manu343726 Aug 12 '13 at 13:44
    
@user2672165 ... no constructor call (casting) is needed, and also the compiler could do a copy-elision optimization. Finally, if you want a string, use a C++ string, not a C string. –  Manu343726 Aug 12 '13 at 13:48
    
@Manu343726: Ok. Then you are correct. I however when I work e.g. enumerations have a rule to use a switch statement because I have bad experience with your solution in that case. This is a case where it is then fine to do as you do. –  user2672165 Aug 12 '13 at 19:30

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