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I've got a problem with casting an object instance by the value of its member. The test case:

class base {
  public:
      virtual int type() const = 0;
};
class derived : public base {
  public:
      virtual int type() const { return 1; }
      virtual void derivedspecific() {}
};

int main() {
    base* test = new derived;
    (test->type()==1?((derived*)test):NULL)->derivedspecific();
}

Imagine, that we have hundreds of child classes and hundreds of cases in the ternary operator all written in a macro. How should I solve this problem? If i put more cases in the ternary operator i got error 'conditional expression between distinct pointer types'. And yeah, the test variable needs to be a base class pointer. It's just a short example.

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4  
This sounds like the WRONG solution to some problem... And you should use dynamic_cast - but in general, you are doing something wrong when you use inheritance and then check what type something is [unless it's a case if if (object->classVersion()>1) ... or something similar to retain backwards compatibility in a binary compatible system]. –  Mats Petersson Aug 12 '13 at 12:21
1  
(test->type()==1?((derived*)test):NULL)->derivedspecific(); could become NULL->derivedspecific(). Don't use the ternary operator to do that. –  nouney Aug 12 '13 at 12:21
    
Then please give me just an idea, how i could cast by a member's value instantly? Macro solution is acceptable for me. Thanks:) –  Daniel Adamko Aug 12 '13 at 12:25
    
See Karadur's suggestion - that is what I think you should be doing - to use casts from a baseclass to a derived class is wrong. –  Mats Petersson Aug 12 '13 at 12:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, your derivedspecific doesn't need to be virual as it looks like you don't call it by a pointer to base class. I assume that the name will always be different in derived classes. Otherwise, if derivedspecific is always the same name and signature, you don't actually need type():

class base
{
public: 
    virtual int doWork() const = 0;
};
class derived : public base
{
public:
    virtual void doWork() { /* do your work here*/ }
};
int main()
{
    base* test = new derived; 
    test->doWork(); 
}
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Somehow i need the derived classes to be different. Some will have zero specific methods, some will dozens. So basically i have to declare all of the derived specific methods in the base class? –  Daniel Adamko Aug 12 '13 at 12:33
1  
In that case, why would you need to have a common base class for them? This may be an indication that inheritance isn't really a good fit. Can you tell that derived objects are base class? Like in classical example, "bus is vehicle" hence in theory you can derive Bus from Vehicle. If you can't tell that your derived is base, try using composition and/or aggregation. –  Karadur Aug 12 '13 at 12:40
    
I'm working on an AST representation. AST contains statements. Every statement have different things. Now you now why. Okay i could do that every statement is Statement type but this would be very confusing for hundreds of statements and expression operators and etc. –  Daniel Adamko Aug 12 '13 at 12:51
    
Ok,with AST, you've got Nodes and a Node can be a base class in fact. However each type of node normally knows about limited number of possible child types. If you're writing a compiler, a node will typically have virtual methods like compile(), reduce(), check() etc. The content and functionality in nodes can be implemented via composition. You will rarely need to cast base type to derived, because, for example, an list of function arguments will be a node of type, say, NodeFuncArgList, and this node will hold a list of NodeFuncArg's. So it will know the type of its list elements. –  Karadur Aug 12 '13 at 13:10
    
Okay, Karadur, i will create another ticket for this problem. Looks like i tried to solve this from a wrong perspective. –  Daniel Adamko Aug 12 '13 at 13:28
  1. NULL->derivedspecific() won't compile
  2. ((derived*)NULL)->derivedspecific() is undefined behaviour (segmentation fault on most platforms

there is a mechanism which is specifically designed to support this kind of behaviour, i.e. dynamic_cast which goes like:

#include <typeinfo>

class base
{
    public:
        virtual ~base(){};
};
class derived1 : public base
{
    public:
        void derived1specific() const {}
};
class derived2 : public base
{
    public:
        void derived2specific() const {}
};
int main()
{
    // use pointers
    base* test = new derived1;
    derived2* d2 = dynamic_cast<derived2*>(test);
    if(d2)
        d2->derived2specific();
    derived1* d1 = dynamic_cast<derived1*>(test);
    if(d1)
        d1->derived1specific();

    // or simply
    if(derived1* d1 = dynamic_cast<derived1*>(test) )
        d1->derived1specific();
    else if(derived2* d2 = dynamic_cast<derived2*>(test))
        d2->derived2specific();


    // use references
    const base& testr = derived1();
    try{
        const derived1& d1 = dynamic_cast<const derived1&>(testr);
        d1.derived1specific();
    }
    catch(std::bad_cast&){}
    try{
        const derived2& d2 = dynamic_cast<const derived2&>(testr);
        d2.derived2specific();
    }
    catch(std::bad_cast&){}
}

What you wanted to do, which I would not recommend you, is something like:

auto doNothing = [](){return;};
(test->type()==1?(((derived1*)test)->derived1specific()):doNothing());

You can try the full code here.

As for your comment: you can substitute the macro with a free-function (which is advisable anyway)

void derived1specific(base* b){
    if(derived1* d1 = dynamic_cast<derived1*>(b))
        d1->derived1specific();
}

which does exactly what your code wants to do: execute the derived specific function if and only if it is appropriate; you simply call it like:

derived1specific(test);
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Yeah it's nice but imagine i have hundreds of these derives. I have to write this down every time when i want to use its members/methods. Second thing i thought is using templates but it wont work because they are working at compile time. –  Daniel Adamko Aug 12 '13 at 12:41
    
You wouldn't need to write it every time, you can use a free-function, pretty much as you would have used the macro. Using the function is better anyway! –  Stefano Falasca Aug 12 '13 at 12:53

For that, use a switch:

Base * test = //something returning a Base *
switch(test)
{
   case 0 :
      static_cast<Derived0*>(test)/*[...]*/;
      break;
   case 1 :
      static_cast<Derived1*>(test)/*[...]*/;
      break;
//...
}

If There is only one class wich return the same type(), so, you can use static_cast, because you are sure.

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