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Imagine the following dataset (column vector):

df <- data.frame(a=c("AB3474","AB3482","AB3458","AB3487","AB3471","AB3452"))
df
       a
1 AB3474
2 AB3482
3 AB3458
4 AB3487
5 AB3471
6 AB3452

Now I want to build a new vector which gets values, that "a" has on the fifth position. So the resulting df should look like this:

df_new
       a new
1 AB3474   7
2 AB3482   8
3 AB3458   5
4 AB3487   8
5 AB3471   7
6 AB3452   5

I "sapplied" over the splitted string (using sapply and strsplit), but I guess there are simpler and hopefully faster ways for solving this.

Any suggestions?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use this:

df_new <- within(df, new <- substr(a, 5, 5))

Result:

       a new
1 AB3474   7
2 AB3482   8
3 AB3458   5
4 AB3487   8
5 AB3471   7
6 AB3452   5

EDIT: to answer the comment below:

within(df, new <- paste0(substr(a, 5, 5), ifelse(as.numeric(substr(a, 6, 6))>5, "b", "a")))

Result:

       a new
1 AB3474  7a
2 AB3482  8a
3 AB3458  5b
4 AB3487  8b
5 AB3471  7a
6 AB3452  5a

Note that as.numeric is preffered to avoid lexical comparisons.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, and what if the last (6th) number has to be taken into account, too. for instance, if the last is > 5, then fifth value +b, else +a. so "new" would then get the values: 7a,8a,5b,8b,7a,5a. a and b can of course be replaced by anthing. it's just about the Problem described. maybe substr(substr())?? –  beginneR Aug 12 '13 at 15:13
    
@Macs, see edit above. –  Ferdinand.kraft Aug 12 '13 at 15:21

If you have a looooooooot of rows maybe you will benefit from some Rcpp compiled code goodness. You could stick this in a file with the extension .cpp:

#include <Rcpp.h>
#include <string>

using namespace Rcpp;

//[[Rcpp::export]]

std::vector< std::string > extrC(CharacterVector x, int y) {
    int n = x.size();
    std::vector< std::string > out(n);

    for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
      std::string tmp = Rcpp::as<std::string>(x[i]);
      out[i] = tmp[y-1]; //note the difference between indexing in R and C++ - C++ starts at 0!
    }
    return out;
  }

Then in R:

require(Rcpp)
sourceCpp("C:/path/to/file.cpp")
df$new <- extrC( df$a , 5 )
df
       a new
1 AB3474   7
2 AB3482   8
3 AB3458   5
4 AB3487   8
5 AB3471   7
6 AB3452   5

The idea

Take a character vector as input, and an integer for the position in each string you would like to extract a the value at. Return a std::vector< std::string > and let Rcpp handle wrapping of standard library objects to R objects. std::string objects have the at method which we can use to extract the desired character.

Note, this probably isn't very safe because we don't do any checking to see if the desired index actually falls in each character string.

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I suspect this will be slower than the equivalent R code because you have to convert in and out of R's string class. –  hadley Aug 12 '13 at 14:39
    
@hadley I just asked a question on R chat to this effect - I just did some benchmarking and found that to be the case. I am wondering if there is a way to avoid this (e.g. is there an at() method for R's string class?) –  Simon O'Hanlon Aug 12 '13 at 14:42
    
Not that I know of - generally R's internal string functions will be much faster than the Rcpp equivalents until someone spends a lot of time writing all the necessary shims. –  hadley Aug 12 '13 at 14:44
    
@hadley stringrcpp?! :-) –  Simon O'Hanlon Aug 12 '13 at 14:51
    
@ Simon0101 Thanks for your answer. Fortunately, using substr was fast enough! –  beginneR Aug 12 '13 at 15:18

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