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This question already has an answer here:

This code takes value returned from a function, creates and puts it in a new address space called variable 'b'

    int main()
{
    int b;
    b = topkek();
    std::cout << &b;


};

int topkek()
 {
    int kek = 2;

    return kek;

 };

Now I understand because variable kek was inside of topkek method I can not access it from main() method. With C++ and pointers, I figured out how I could access a variable declared inside a method even after the method has terminated, look at this code.

int main()
{
    int * a;
    a = topkek();  //a is now pointing at kek

    std::cout << *a; //outputs 2, the value of kek.

    *a = 3;

    std::cout << *a; //output 3, changed the value of kek.

    std::cin >> *a;


};

int * topkek()
 {
int kek = 2;
    int* b = &kek;  //intializing pointer b to point to kek's address in stack

    return b; //returning pointer to kek

};

Is this method safe? Would the compiler prevent kek's address space being overwritten later in code because it still understand it's being used?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by jrok, juanchopanza, Paul R, nogard, jman Aug 12 '13 at 18:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
No, it's not safe. – jrok Aug 12 '13 at 14:28
1  
No, this is the unsafest thing to do with pointers. Don't do that. Once a variable goes out of scope it stops existing - if you keep a pointer to it, you'll eventually run into undefined behavior. – Nbr44 Aug 12 '13 at 14:29
    
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is undefined behavior: once the function finishes, accessing a variable inside it by pointer or reference makes the program invalid, and may cause a crash.

It is perfectly valid, however, to access a variable when you go "back" on the stack:

void assign(int* ptr) {
    *ptr = 1234;
}
int main() {
    int kek = 5;
    cout << kek << endl;
    assign(&kek);
    cout << kek << endl;
}

Note how assign has accessed the value of a local variable declared inside another function. This is legal, because main has not finished at the time the access has happened.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I used to write in C# and high level langauges. I thought this was wrong but the compiler was ok with it and it worked. – InstallGentoo Aug 13 '13 at 5:08

No it is not safe. After your function finished execution, you are not pointing to an int anymore but just to some random place in memory. Its value could be anything since it can be modified elsewhere in your program.

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Most definitely not safe. Undefined behavior will result.

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When a local variable is "created", the compiler does so by giving the variable some space on the the stack [1]. This space is available for the variable as long as you are inside that function. When the function returns, the space is released, and available for other functions to use. So the address of b in your second code is returning a pointer to memory that will be releasted just after the return finishes.

Try adding something like this:

int foo()
{
     int x = 42;
     cout << "x = " << x << endl;
     return x;
}

and call foo after your call to topkek, and it's pretty certain that the value in kek (or pointed to by kek) will change.

[1] For the pedants: Yes, the C++ standard doesn't specify that there needs to be a stack, or how local variables are supposed to be used, etc, etc. But in general, in nearly all compilers available today, this is how it works.

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Locally allocated automatic types will be automatically deallocated when exiting the function scope. The pointer you return will then point to deallocated memory. Accessing this memory will result in undefined behaviour.

int* topkek() {
    int kek = 2; // Create a local int kek

    int* b = &kek;  // Declare pointer to kek

    return b; // Return pointer to local variable. <-- Never do this!
}; // kek is destroyed and the returned pointer points to deallocated memory.
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This is undefined behavior. After returning from the function, kek does not exist any more, and the pointer returned points into nirvana, to the location where kek once was. Accessing it gives undefined behavior. Undefined behavior means, anything can happen. You could indeed get the value that once was in kek or your application crashes, or you get some garbage value, or your compiler sees fit to order you a pizza online, with extra cheese, please.

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This will be safe:

int * topkek()
{
    static int kek = 2;
    int* b = &kek;  //intializing pointer b to point to kek's address in stack
    return b; //returning pointer to kek
};
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This is undefined behavior, kek is a local variable and the memory it resides in will be released once you exit topkek. It may seem like it works but since it is undefined anything can result, it can break at any time and you can not rely on the results.

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First, this is definitely unsafe as others have noted. But based on your usage, I think you might actually be trying to define an object. For example, this code might be what you want:

struct topkek{
    int kek;
    int *operator()() {
        kek = 2;
        return &kek;
    }
};

int main()
{
    topkek mykek;

    int *a = mykek(); // sets mykek.kek to 2, returns pointer to kek

    std::cout << *a;
    *a = 3;
    std::cout << *a;
    std::cin >> *a;
};

This will give you clean access to the underlying kek variable in a totally safe way. You can of course put any code you want into the operator() method.

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