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I created an extension method to avoid having to type code like the "if" below:

Guid? nullableGuid = something;

if (!nullableGuid.HasValue || nullableGuid == Guid.Empty)
{
    // do stuff
}
else
{
    // do other stuff
}

My extension method is:

public static bool IsNullOrEmpty(this Guid? g)
{
    return !g.HasValue || g.Value == Guid.Empty;
}

Which is nice, because now my code looks cleaner and is easier to read:

Guid? nullableGuid = something;

if (nullableGuid.IsNullOrEmpty())
{
    // do stuff
}
else
{
    // do other stuff
}

The problem is, now resharper will complain if I try to use the Guid in the else block. It does not realize that I checked for HasValue inside the extension method. Of course, I can suppress the warning with comments or change the resharper options, but neither of those are good options. If I have to comment the code everywhere, it tends to defeat the purpose of making the code cleaner in the first place. If I change the resharper options, well, that would just be crazy.

I'm wondering if there is a better option. Is there a way to "tell" resharper it is "okay" without having to comment the code everywhere or disable the check?

share|improve this question
2  
I don't see how Resharper could be aware that you are doing a null check in that extension method. If you do find a solution, I'd be curious to know what it is. –  Joe Brunscheon Aug 12 '13 at 15:37
    
Show the code as you have stated in your question I do not see GUID being used in any of the else statements you've provided please show all relevant code –  MethodMan Aug 12 '13 at 15:37
    
@JoeBrunscheon, you are probably correct. I was hoping someone knew of a feature that I haven't found. –  James R. Aug 12 '13 at 15:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can "tell" Resharper through a contract annotation. http://blogs.jetbrains.com/dotnet/2012/08/contract-annotations-in-resharper-7/

An example from that link:

[ContractAnnotation("s:null => true")]
public bool IsNullOrEmpty(string s)

From that, I would gather the following would do the trick for you:

[ContractAnnotation("g:null => true")]
public bool IsNullOrEmpty(this Guid? g)

Update:

If you don't actually want to take a dependency on the Jetbrains annotation assembly, I think you can define the contract externally, see http://blogs.jetbrains.com/dotnet/2010/11/resharper-nullreferenceexception-analysis-and-its-contracts/ for more details on that and the JetBrain contracts in general.

share|improve this answer
    
Dude, that is awesome. Thank you! –  James R. Aug 12 '13 at 16:09
    
Thanks for the update. I can understand not wanting the dependency, but in this case, I'm not too worried about it. Just happy to get rid of the squiggly lines! –  James R. Aug 12 '13 at 17:15

I guess sometimes you have to overlook some ReSharper warnings. Or you use project settings and set it as hint (for example). But it's annoying. If you work on team projects I prefer not to suspress any ReSharper warnings.

share|improve this answer
    
It is annoying for sure. And yes, I have "demoted" some things to hint just for that very reason. But I love ReSharper and never write code without it! –  James R. Aug 12 '13 at 15:41
1  
I feel your pain. Also I can suggest use CTRL + ALT + SHIFT + 8 to temporarily disable ReSharper. Sometimes it's better to read code. Especially if you read someone else's code. –  Lucas Aug 12 '13 at 15:44

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