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What's a good technique for validating an e-mail address (e.g. from a user input field) in Android? org.apache.commons.validator.routines.EmailValidator doesn't seem to be available. Are there any other libraries doing this which are included in Android already or would I have to use RegExp?

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please refers this one, may it will help you: stackoverflow.com/questions/12947620/… –  user2757064 Apr 15 '13 at 4:48
1  
@user2757064 well this question should help the other question you linked. That question was asked 3 years after this. :) –  Sufian Aug 15 at 7:44

19 Answers 19

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Don't use a reg-ex.

Apparently the following is a reg-ex that correctly validates most e-mails addresses that conform to RFC 2822, (and will still fail on things like "user@gmail.com.nospam", as will org.apache.commons.validator.routines.EmailValidator)

(?:[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*|"(?:[\x01-\x08\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x1f\x21\x23-\x5b\x5d-\x7f]|\\[\x01-\x09\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x7f])*")@(?:(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?|\[(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?|[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]:(?:[\x01-\x08\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x1f\x21-\x5a\x53-\x7f]|\\[\x01-\x09\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x7f])+)\])

Possibly the easiest way to validate an e-mail to just send a confirmation e-mail to the address provided and it it bounces then it's not valid.

If you want to perform some basic checks you could just check that it's in the form *@*

If you have some business logic specific validation then you could perform that using a regex, e.g. must be a gmail.com account or something.

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3  
I know this answer is about two years old, but when I try this regex using regexr.com, it validates user@gmail.com.nospam, and even longer tlds like .museum. Am I missing something? I don't want to block any of my users by failing to validate their valid e-mail address, but this seems to be working for anything I can think of. –  Bob Vork Oct 25 '11 at 7:55
    
@Bob validate Email Address on the server.. check foursquare app it does the same –  Harsha M V Oct 29 '11 at 20:18
    
@Harsha I agree with validation on a server, but in my case that isn't possible. I'm making an app where the user can set a mail address to send e-mails to. It's not a subscription and the user doesn't have an account, so I am not sending any confirmation e-mails on every change of the e-mail address… Right now the user just gets a warning when the regex doesn't agree with the e-mail address, but it's not blocking. I was mostly asking out of curiosity :) –  Bob Vork Oct 31 '11 at 14:53
9  
I'm a bit confused why you start this answer with "Don't use a reg-ex" and then proceed to provide a reg-ex. –  howettl Aug 1 '13 at 19:21
1  
Please keep reading. A better solution is below which does not use regex. –  loeschg Jan 27 at 23:10

Another option is the built in Patterns starting with API Level 8:

public final static boolean isValidEmail(CharSequence target) {
  if (TextUtils.isEmpty(target)) {
    return false;
  } else {
    return android.util.Patterns.EMAIL_ADDRESS.matcher(target).matches();
  }
}

Patterns viewable source

OR

One line solution from @AdamvandenHoven:

public final static boolean isValidEmail(CharSequence target) {
  return !TextUtils.isEmpty(target) && android.util.Patterns.EMAIL_ADDRESS.matcher(target).matches();
}
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11  
+1 , but i prefer replace the (target == null) with TextUtils.isEmpty(target) :) –  Houcine Dec 16 '13 at 17:40
1  
+1 This answer should have been accepted. –  VikramV Dec 28 '13 at 13:44
4  
Answers like these are why I dislike accepted answers being shown on top, instead of answers with most votes. –  Jeshurun Jan 12 at 19:58
1  
straight into my lib –  rupps Apr 8 at 21:22
2  
Would it also not make more sense (readability wise) to simply combine this into one line: return !TextUtils.isEmpty(target) && android.util.Patterns.EMAIL_ADDRESS.matcher(target).matches(); –  Adam van den Hoven Apr 17 at 16:35

Next pattern is used in K-9 mail:

public final Pattern EMAIL_ADDRESS_PATTERN = Pattern.compile(
          "[a-zA-Z0-9\\+\\.\\_\\%\\-\\+]{1,256}" +
          "\\@" +
          "[a-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9\\-]{0,64}" +
          "(" +
          "\\." +
          "[a-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9\\-]{0,25}" +
          ")+"
      );

So you can use function

private boolean checkEmail(String email) {
        return EMAIL_ADDRESS_PATTERN.matcher(email).matches();
}
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+1 ..good example –  Sameer Mar 15 '12 at 15:05
25  
Why not use android.util.Patterns.EMAIL_ADDRESS ? –  Sergey Metlov Mar 18 '12 at 13:56
5  
cause it exists since API Level 8 only –  Andrei Buneyeu Mar 20 '12 at 7:59
    
Thnkx a lot for the above code its working fine. –  KAREEM MAHAMMED Sep 25 '12 at 7:41
    
this helped me a lot thanks and +1 for the simple answer.. :) –  Deepthi Feb 11 '13 at 10:04

Since API 8 (android 2.2) there is a pattern: android.util.Patterns.EMAIL_ADDRESS http://developer.android.com/reference/android/util/Patterns.html

So you can use it to validate yourEmailString:

private boolean validEmail(String email) {
    Pattern pattern = Patterns.EMAIL_ADDRESS;
    return pattern.matcher(email).matches();
}

returns true if the email is valid

UPD: This pattern source code is:

public static final Pattern EMAIL_ADDRESS
    = Pattern.compile(
        "[a-zA-Z0-9\\+\\.\\_\\%\\-\\+]{1,256}" +
        "\\@" +
        "[a-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9\\-]{0,64}" +
        "(" +
            "\\." +
            "[a-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9\\-]{0,25}" +
        ")+"
    );

refer to: http://grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/ext/com.google.android/android/2.2_r1.1/android/util/Patterns.java

So you can build it yourself for compatibility with API < 8.

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You can use regular expression to do so. Something like the following.

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(".+@.+\\.[a-z]+");

String email = "xyz@xyzdomain.com";

Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(email);

boolean matchFound = matcher.matches();

Note: Check the regular expression given above, don't use it as it is.

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2  
This fails on the following valid email address: "Example Guy" <guy@example.com>. While you technically can validate email with a regex, it's a little absurd to do so. –  Cory Petosky Aug 18 '11 at 20:12

Call This Method where you want to validate email ID.

public static boolean isValid(String email)
{
   String expression = "^[\\w\\.-]+@([\\w\\-]+\\.)+[A-Z]{2,4}$";
   CharSequence inputStr = email;
   Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(expression, Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
   Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(inputStr);
   if (matcher.matches()) 
   {
      return true;
   }
   else{
   return false;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    public boolean isValidEmail(String email)
{
    boolean isValidEmail = false;

    String emailExpression = "^[\\w\\.-]+@([\\w\\-]+\\.)+[A-Z]{2,4}$";
    CharSequence inputStr = email;

    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(emailExpression, Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(inputStr);
    if (matcher.matches())
    {
        isValidEmail = true;
    }
    return isValidEmail;
}
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Can I STRONGLY recommend you don't try to 'validate' email addresses, you'll just get yourself into a lot of work for no good reason.

Just make sure what is entered won't break your own code - e.g. no spaces or illegal characters which might cause an Exception.

Anything else will just cause you a lot of work for minimal return...

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2  
When working with subscriptions and payments this is hardly useful advice. If someone forgets their password we must have a way of securely resetting their password to allow them to continue using the service they have paid for. So sometimes it is best that we ensure they are entering a valid e-mail address for their own sake. –  Dean Wild Feb 7 '12 at 9:46
1  
Just to be clear about what I said - if someone is intent on entering a fake/wrong address - no amount of validation will stop them.. Checking for silly mistakes like spaces and no '@' etc. is fine - checking anything else is well into 'diminishing returns'... –  John Peat Dec 16 '12 at 15:17
    
The only way to identify a fake email is via sending an email to that email id and check whether u receive an undelivered report... –  Sreekanth Karumanaghat Mar 11 '13 at 11:01

Validate your email address format. Ex-virag@gmail.com

public boolean emailValidator(String email) 
{
    Pattern pattern;
    Matcher matcher;
    final String EMAIL_PATTERN = "^[_A-Za-z0-9-]+(\\.[_A-Za-z0-9-]+)*@[A-Za-z0-9]+(\\.[A-Za-z0-9]+)*(\\.[A-Za-z]{2,})$";
    pattern = Pattern.compile(EMAIL_PATTERN);
    matcher = pattern.matcher(email);
    return matcher.matches();
}
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Note that most of the regular expressions are not valid for international domain names (IDN) and new top level domains like .mobi or .info (if you check for country codes or .org, .com, .gov and so on).

A valid check should separate the local part (before the at-sign) and the domain part. You should also consider the max length of the local part and domain (in sum 255 chars including the at-sign).

The best approach is to transform the address in an IDN compatible format (if required), validate the local part (RFC), check the length of the address and the check the availability of the domain (DNS MX lookup) or simply send an email.

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Try this simple method which can not accept the email address beginning with digits:

boolean checkEmailCorrect(String Email) {
    if(signupEmail.length() == 0) {
        return false;
    }

    String pttn = "^\\D.+@.+\\.[a-z]+";
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile(pttn);
    Matcher m = p.matcher(Email);

    if(m.matches()) {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}
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The Linkify class has some pretty useful helper methods that might be relevant, including regular expressions designed to pick up phone numbers and email addresses and such:

http://developer.android.com/reference/android/text/util/Linkify.html

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I have used follwing code.This works grate.I hope this will help you.

if (validMail(yourEmailString)){
   //do your stuf
 }else{
 //email is not valid.
}

and use follwing method.This returns true if email is valid.

    private boolean validMail(String yourEmailString) {
    Pattern emailPattern = Pattern.compile(".+@.+\\.[a-z]+");
    Matcher emailMatcher = emailPattern.matcher(emailstring);
    return emailMatcher.matches();
}
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email is your email-is.

public boolean validateEmail(String email) {

    Pattern pattern;
    Matcher matcher;
    String EMAIL_PATTERN = "^[_A-Za-z0-9-]+(\\.[_A-Za-z0-9-]+)*@[A-Za-z0-9]+(\\.[A-Za-z0-9]+)*(\\.[A-Za-z]{2,})$";
    pattern = Pattern.compile(EMAIL_PATTERN);
    matcher = pattern.matcher(email);
    return matcher.matches();

    }
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Simplest way of Email Validation.

EditText TF;
public Button checkButton;

public final Pattern EMAIL_ADDRESS_PATTERN = Pattern.compile(
          "[a-zA-Z0-9+._%-+]{1,256}" +
          "@" +
          "[a-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,64}" +
          "(" +
          "." +
          "[a-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,25}" +
          ")+"
      );
 @Override
 public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    requestWindowFeature(Window.FEATURE_NO_TITLE);
    setContentView(R.layout.main);

   TF=(EditText) findViewById(R.id.TF);
   checkButton=(Button) findViewById(R.id.checkButton);

    checkButton.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(View v) {
           String email=TF.getText().toString();
           if(checkEmail(email))
              Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(),"Valid Email Addresss", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
           else
              Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(),"Invalid Email Addresss", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
    }
    });
}
private boolean checkEmail(String email) {
    return EMAIL_ADDRESS_PATTERN.matcher(email).matches();
}}
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For regex lovers, the very best (e.g. consistant with RFC 822) email's pattern I ever found since now is the following (before PHP supplied filters). I guess it's easy to translate this into Java - for those playing with API < 8 :

private static function email_regex_pattern() {
// Source:  http://www.iamcal.com/publish/articles/php/parsing_email
$qtext = '[^\\x0d\\x22\\x5c\\x80-\\xff]';
$dtext = '[^\\x0d\\x5b-\\x5d\\x80-\\xff]';
$atom = '[^\\x00-\\x20\\x22\\x28\\x29\\x2c\\x2e\\x3a-\\x3c'.
    '\\x3e\\x40\\x5b-\\x5d\\x7f-\\xff]+';
$quoted_pair = '\\x5c[\\x00-\\x7f]';
$domain_literal = "\\x5b($dtext|$quoted_pair)*\\x5d";
$quoted_string = "\\x22($qtext|$quoted_pair)*\\x22";
$domain_ref = $atom;
$sub_domain = "($domain_ref|$domain_literal)";
$word = "($atom|$quoted_string)";
$domain = "$sub_domain(\\x2e$sub_domain)*";
$local_part = "$word(\\x2e$word)*";
$pattern = "!^$local_part\\x40$domain$!";
return $pattern ;
}
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You can do any type of validation in android very easily by the oval.jar file. OVal is a pragmatic and extensible general purpose validation framework for any kind of Java objects.

follow this link: http://oval.sourceforge.net/userguide.html

You can downlaod this from here: http://oval.sourceforge.net/userguide.html#download

You can use validation by setting tags in variables

public class Something{

    @NotEmpty  //not empty validation
    @Email     //email validation
    @SerializedName("emailAddress")
    private String emailAddress;
}

   private void checkValidation() {
        Something forgotpass.setEmailAddress(LoginActivity.this.dialog_email.getText().toString());
        Validator validator = new Validator();
        //collect the constraint violations
        List<ConstraintViolation> violations = validator.validate(forgotpass);
        if(violations.size()>0){
            for (ConstraintViolation cv : violations){
                if(cv.getMessage().contains("emailAddress")){
                    dialog_email.setError(ValidationMessage.formattedError(cv.getMessage(), forgotpass));
                }
            }
        }
}
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Try this code.. Its really works..

            if (!email
                    .matches("^[\\w-_\\.+]*[\\w-_\\.]\\@([\\w]+\\.)+[\\w]+[\\w]$"))
            {
                Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "Email is invalid",
                        Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
                return;
            }
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We use TowerData webservice. It does also validate the existence of the address. There is a per validation fee but it's suitable for a business that needs to perform such validation.

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