Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Gives the following discrepancy when printing an array:

Output of last run, given array size of 10: 1054923524,536171146,1590310503,900411369,764853670,471563977,933417110,1800497411,544592671,135121 1054923524,536171146,1590310503,900411369,764853670,471563977,933417110,1800497411,544592671,0,

Any idea why it it prints "0" instead of what I thought is the last digit of the array?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

main() {
  srandom(time(NULL));
  printf("Size:");
  int n;
  scanf("%d",&n);
  int *ints;
  ints=malloc(sizeof(int)*n);
  int i;
  for(i=1; i<n-1;i++) {
    int a=random();
    ints[i]=a;
    printf("%d,",a);
  }
  printf("%d\n",ints[n]);
  sort(&ints[0],&ints[n]);
  free(ints);
}

void sort(int *begin, int *end) {
  int i;
  for(i=0;&(begin[i])!=end;i++) {
    printf("%d,",begin[i]);
  }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Please don't cast the result of malloc. – Philip Kendall Aug 12 '13 at 18:30
    
Thanks. Changed that. The problem persists though. – user2452830 Aug 12 '13 at 18:35
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You never stored anything into the last element of the array ints[n-1]. You print the wrong last element of the array, which invokes undefined behavior, since you are reading beyond the end of the allocated memory area.

Change your initialization loop to initialize all members, by looping while i < n. Remove your printf() following the loop, and instead, just print a newline character.

  for(i=0;i<n;i++) {
    int a=random();
    ints[i]=a;
    printf("%d,",a);
  }
  putchar('\n');
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, didn't catch that. – user2452830 Aug 12 '13 at 18:39
    
@user2452830: The suggested changes I provided should be all you need to do to get the print loop in your sort() function to print the same numbers you print during initialization (except for the last newline). – jxh Aug 12 '13 at 18:50
    
I must not have read it completely the first time. That was very helpful. You're right; I created more problems by trying to change other things. This completely solves the problem. Thanks. – user2452830 Aug 12 '13 at 18:54
    
@user2452830: You are very welcome. – jxh Aug 12 '13 at 18:57

There are two mistakes:

  1. The element at index n - 1 is never initialized as your first loops only goes from 0 to n - 2.

  2. The element at index n is beyond the allocated memory.

So the last element you print has index n on the first run, and index n - 1 on the second run.

The fix could look like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

main() {
  srandom(time(NULL));
  printf("Input desired size of array:");
  int n;
  scanf("%d",&n);
  int *ints;
  ints=malloc(sizeof(int)*n);
  if(ints==NULL) {
    perror("malloc returned NULL");
    exit(1);
  }

  int i;
  for(i=0; i < n; i++) {
    int a=random();
    ints[i]=a;
    printf("%d,",a);
  }

  sort(&ints[0],&ints[n],0);
  free(ints);
}

void sort(int *begin, int *end, int ascending) {
  int i;
  for(i=0;&(begin[i])!=end;i++) {
    printf("%d,",begin[i]);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'll change that and try again. – user2452830 Aug 12 '13 at 18:39
    
Stll some problem though; now outputs:1821250995,624166897,1892989986,204514006,2053074628,1250179355,96407265‌​0,1085680991,1771083365,1316936590,1316936590 1821250995,624166897,1892989986,204514006,2053074628,1250179355,964072650,108568‌​0991,1771083365, – user2452830 Aug 12 '13 at 18:41
    
So you don't have to actually look at that: It printed 11 numbers first, then printed 9. – user2452830 Aug 12 '13 at 18:43
    
Changed the condition on the loop while storing elements to: i<n and changed the call to sort to: sort(&ints[0],&ints[n-1],0) – user2452830 Aug 12 '13 at 18:44
    
Also, as pointed out by jxh, removed the printf after the for loop so the 11th number is no longer there. Still only get 9 numbers later though. – user2452830 Aug 12 '13 at 18:49

printf("%d\n",ints[n]);

That's an overflow, its undefined behavior. you want printf("%d\n",ints[n-1]);

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.