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My goal is to make a Java object immutable. I have a class Student. I coded it in the following way to achieve immutability:

public final class Student {

private String name;
private String age;

public Student(String name, String age) {
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public String getAge() {
    return age;
}

}

My question is, what is the best way to achieve immutability for the Student class?

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1  
From the Java tutorials: A Strategy for Defining Immutable Objects –  Ted Hopp Aug 12 '13 at 18:40

9 Answers 9

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Your class is not immutable strictly speaking, it is only effectively immutable. To make it immutable, you need to use final:

private final String name;
private final String age;

Although the difference might seem subtle, it can make a significant difference in a multi-threaded context. An immutable class is inherently thread-safe, an effectively immutable class is thread safe only if it is safely published.

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What would be the correct pattern for an immutable class which encapsulates an instance of a mutable class, but will never allow that instance to be exposed to any code which might mutate it once the constructor returns? For example, a final field of foo holds an array arr and the last thing the constructor does is store a 5 into element 3. If one thread does blah=new foo() and another thread accesses blah.arr[5], I understand the store of array reference to arr is guaranteed to be occur before the second thread sees the write to blah, but what about the write to arr[5]? –  supercat Aug 19 '13 at 16:27
    
@supercat not 100% sure to be honest. You should ask the question. I think a safe pattern would be to populate a temporary array then assign it to your final variable. But if you populate the final variable directly I'm not sure. –  assylias Aug 19 '13 at 16:54

With final keyword:

private final String name;
private final String age;
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This is fine but I would make the fields final as well.

Also I would make the age an int or double rather than a String.

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It already is immutable -- you can't change the contents once you initialize it, since you haven't made setters. You might add final keywords to the variables.

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Making all variables as final and when setting some field, making it return the reference to the new Student object with the newly set value like in String.

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You can just follow guidelines shown in this example (first result in google): http://www.javapractices.com/topic/TopicAction.do?Id=29

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There are few things that you must consider for making an immutable class:

  • Make your class final - You already have
  • Make all the fields private and final - Make appropriate changes in your code
  • Don't provide any methods that change the state of your instance
  • If you have mutable fields in your class, like List, or Date, making them final won't suffice. You should return a defensive copy from their getters, so that their state isn't mutated by calling methods.

For the 4th point, say you have a Date field in your class, then the getter for that field should look like:

public Date getDate() {
    return new Date(this.date.getTime());
}

Making a defensive copy can become a headache, when your mutable field itself comprises of some mutable field, and that in turn can contain some other mutable field. In that case, you would need to make copy of each of them iteratively. We name this iterative copy of mutable fields as Deep Copy.

Implementing deep copy by yourself may be cumbersome. But,keeping that issue apart, you should consider your class design again, once you see yourself falling into such requirement of making deep defensive copy.

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1  
"Don't provide any methods that change the state of your instance" I don't think this is a requirement. As long as the state change is not visible to the outside world, it will be fine. –  arshajii Aug 12 '13 at 18:42
1  
If you have a private field that nobody else can see. –  arshajii Aug 12 '13 at 18:45
1  
I mean if there are no getters/setters, just a field to be used by the object itself. Maybe our definitions of 'state change' are different; would you consider changing such a field to be a state change? –  arshajii Aug 12 '13 at 18:47
1  
@arshajii - If internal state of an object can change, the object is not immutable. If the internal state enters into the logic of equals or hashCode, then the internal state is (indirectly) visible to the outside world. –  Ted Hopp Aug 12 '13 at 18:48
1  
@arshajii. Just went through the source code. Seems like you're right. And now I'm confused. –  Rohit Jain Aug 12 '13 at 19:00

Your example is already immutable object, because fields in Student class can only set on instance initialization.

To make object immutable, You must do these steps:

  1. Don't use any methods, which can change fields of your class. For example don't use Setters.
  2. Avoid to use public non-final fields. If your fields is public then you must declare them as final and initialize them in constructor or directly in the declaration line.
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Here are few rules, which helps to make a class immutable in Java : 1. State of immutable object can not be modified after construction, any modification should result in new immutable object. 2. All fields of Immutable class should be final. 3. Object must be properly constructed i.e. object reference must not leak during construction process. 4. Object should be final in order to restrict sub-class for altering immutability of parent class.

Example:

public final class Contacts {

private final String name;
private final String mobile;

public Contacts(String name, String mobile) {
    this.name = name;
    this.mobile = mobile;
}

public String getName(){
    return name;
}

public String getMobile(){
    return mobile;
}

}

Refer this link : http://javarevisited.blogspot.in/2013/03/how-to-create-immutable-class-object-java-example-tutorial.html

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