Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an 802.3 wired transmitter application on my computer that I've written to broadcast UDP packets every 10ms. Each broadcast packet contains a 4-byte integer value that is unique to its particular packet, which allows me to figure out on the receiver end exactly how many packets have been dropped.

I have verified that the transmitter works with Wireshark. I set up four 802.11 receivers (2 android phones and 2 laptop computers) on the same network. The laptops received 95% of the UDP broadcast packets; one phone received 89%; the other phone received 40%.

Why?

Here is part of my android receiver code:

public class NetThread extends Thread {

    int[] pkt_nums; 
    int p; 

    NetThread(int[] pkt_nums)
    {
        this.pkt_nums = pkt_nums; 
        for (int i=0; i<pkt_nums.length; i++)
        {
            pkt_nums[i]=0; 
        }
        p = 0; 
    }

    @Override
    public void run() 
    {
        receiveData(); 
    }

    public void receiveData()
    {
        // request permission to do network operations in manifest file...done

        // start the network side of things
        DatagramSocket sock = null; 
        DatagramPacket pkt = null; 

        try 
        {
            byte[] data = new byte[C.PAYLOAD_MAX]; 
            sock = new DatagramSocket(C.NET_PORT); 
            sock.setSoTimeout(C.NET_SO_TIMEOUT);
            pkt = new DatagramPacket(data, 0, C.PAYLOAD_MAX); 

            while (true)
            {
                Thread.sleep(0); // allow for an interrupt
                try 
                {
                    sock.receive(pkt); 
                    int length = pkt.getLength(); 
                    boolean success = writeToBuffer(pkt.getData(), length); 
                    if (!success) break; 
                }
                catch (InterruptedIOException e)
                {
                    // thrown when a timeout occurs
                    Log.d(C.DTAG, "net: no packets yet"); 
                }
            }
            Log.d(C.DTAG, "buffer is full. done receiving."); 
            if (sock != null) sock.close(); 
        } 
        catch (InterruptedException x) 
        {
            Log.d(C.DTAG, "net: was interrupted."); 
        } 
        catch (SocketException e) 
        {
            Log.d(C.DTAG, "net: SocketException"); 
            e.printStackTrace();
        } 
        catch (IOException e) 
        {
            Log.d(C.DTAG, "net: IOException"); 
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        if (sock != null) sock.close(); 
    }

    public boolean writeToBuffer(byte[] data, int length)
    {
        // each packet should have exactly 4 bytes - a number
        int pkt_num = data[0] & 0x000000FF | data[1]<<8 & 0x0000FF00 | data[2]<<16 & 0x00FF0000 | data[3]<<24 & 0xFF000000; 

        if (p < pkt_nums.length) 
        {
            pkt_nums[p++] = pkt_num; 
            return true; // success
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

}

I declare the above class in my main activity as follows:

mNetThrd = new NetThread(pkt_nums); 
mNetThrd.setDaemon(true); 
mNetThrd.start(); 

I will try boosting the thread priority now, but I have a feeling I'm doing something wrong. I need to get at least 95% of UDP broadcast packets for my application.

More details: Laptops and phones are situated next to each other, 30 ft from the router with line-of sight visibility. Laptop 1 received 95% of packets. Laptop 2 received 94%. Phone 1 received 89%. Phone 2 received 40%. Both ran the same app. Other network traffic is minimal. Dropped packets in android typically happen in groups of 20-50 at a time. 802.11 has a clean channel. Each packet contains a 4-byte payload.

Is there something drastically wrong with my receiver code or is this another issue altogether?

share|improve this question
    
Can you use some other network monitoring app? I am not sure, if we can call our channels clean in "wireless forest" unless we have anechoic chamber. But, lets say if the other app gives similar result; then the cause of this can be broad. –  Milanix Aug 13 '13 at 4:39
    
Good point. By "clean," I just mean there are no other 802.11 networks running on the same channel. –  Jared Lindsey Aug 13 '13 at 6:30
    
Why not run "airmon" or "airopeek" to make sure that there's no 802.11 networks running on the same channel. Also, does the device dropping packets has lower specs? –  Milanix Aug 14 '13 at 1:07
    
Good idea. I'll get out Backtrack tonight and run airmon. The interesting thing is that both Android devices are HTC One X models, yet show very different performance. They're virtually identical as far as I know. –  Jared Lindsey Aug 14 '13 at 1:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.