Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider a generic byte reader implementing the following simple API to read an unspecified number of bytes from a data structure that is otherwise inaccessible:

public interface ByteReader
{
    public byte[] read() throws IOException; // Returns null only at EOF
}

How could the above be efficiently converted to a standard Java InputStream, so that an application using all methods defined by the InputStream class, works as expected?

A simple solution would be subclassing InputStream to

  1. Call the read() method of the ByteReader as much as needed by the read(...) methods of the InputStream
  2. Buffer the bytes retrieved in a byte[] array
  3. Return part of the byte array as expected, e.g., 1 byte at a time whenever the InputStream read() method is called.

However, this requires more work to be efficient (e.g., for avoiding multiple byte array allocations). Also, for the application to scale to large input sizes, reading everything into memory and then processing is not an option.

Any ideas or open source implementations that could be used?

share|improve this question
1  
Checked the BufferedInputStream source code. I think it uses similar ideas and perhaps you can extend it to read from your data structure –  c.s. Aug 12 '13 at 18:46
    
Yes it does and I have checked it before writing the question. Essentially a function like fill() is needed, but it seems too complicated in the ByteArrayInputStream implementation, so I was wondering whether there is something simpler. –  PNS Aug 12 '13 at 18:51
    
@PNS You can use Arrays.fill() on the underlying array of a ByteInputStream. –  Jason C Aug 12 '13 at 18:55
    
That is good only for setting one single value to multiple array positions. :-) –  PNS Aug 12 '13 at 18:58
1  
No you can't, but that was not the main subject of the question. The ByteReader has to be converted to an InputStream first, before examining efficiency. –  PNS Aug 13 '13 at 0:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Create multiple ByteArrayInputStream instances around the returned arrays and use them in a stream that provides for concatenation. You could for instance use SequenceInputStream for this.

Trick is to implement a Enumeration<ByteArrayInputStream> that is can use the ByteReader class.

EDIT: I've implemented this answer, but it is probably better to create your own InputStream instance instead. Unfortunately, this solution does not let you handle IOException gracefully.


final Enumeration<ByteArrayInputStream> basEnum = new Enumeration<ByteArrayInputStream>() {

    ByteArrayInputStream baos;
    boolean ended;

    @Override
    public boolean hasMoreElements() {
        if (ended) {
            return false;
        }

        if (baos == null) {
            getNextBA();
            if (ended) {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public ByteArrayInputStream nextElement() {
        if (ended) {
            throw new NoSuchElementException();
        }
        if (baos.available() != 0) {
            return baos;
        }

        getNextBA();
        return baos;
    }

    private void getNextBA() {

        byte[] next;
        try {
            next = byteReader.read();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Issues reading byte arrays");
        }
        if (next == null) {
            ended = true;
            return;
        }
        this.baos = new ByteArrayInputStream(next);
    }
};

SequenceInputStream sis = new SequenceInputStream(basEnum);
share|improve this answer
    
I am aware of the SequenceInputStream but using a ByteArrayInputStream would be neither efficient, nor synchronous. What is needed is invoking the ByteReader read() method only if there are not enough byte retrieved and buffered already to satisfy the demand of the InputStream read(...) methods. –  PNS Aug 12 '13 at 18:54
    
Is new BufferedInputStream(new ByteArrayInputStream(...)) not sufficient? –  Jason C Aug 12 '13 at 18:56
    
Nope, see my comments to your answer. –  PNS Aug 12 '13 at 19:00
    
Thanks and +1 for the implementation, but it is not efficient. Imagine having to call ByteReader.read() thousands or millions of times on a big file... –  PNS Aug 12 '13 at 19:57
1  
What do you mean, not efficient? You supplied us with a single interface, which I used. It does not create any additional buffer. The only thing it creates is additional objects, which are small and can be garbage collected very easily. You ask us for help, but you think you have enough knowledge to immediately judge any submissions. –  owlstead Aug 12 '13 at 20:26

I assume, by your use of "convert", that a replacement is acceptable.

The easiest way to do this is to just use a ByteArrayInputStream, which already provides all the features you are looking for (but must wrap an existing array), or to use any of the other already provided InputStream for reading data from various sources.

It seems like you may be running the risk of reinventing wheels here. If possible, I would consider scrapping your ByteReader interface entirely, and instead going with one of these options:

  1. Replace with ByteInputStream.
  2. Use the various other InputStream classes (depending on the source of the data).
  3. Extend InputStream with your custom implementation.

I'd stick to the existing InputStream class everywhere. I have no idea how your code is structured but you could, for example, add a getInputStream() method to your current data sources, and have them return an appropriate already-existing InputStream (or a custom subclass if necessary).

By the way, I recommend avoiding the term Reader in your own IO classes, as Reader is already heavily used in the Java SDK to indicate stream readers that operate on encoded character data (as opposed to InputStream which generally operates on raw byte data).

share|improve this answer
    
Not a good solution. See my comment to owlstead's answer. –  PNS Aug 12 '13 at 18:55
    
Where is your byte data originally coming from? Is new BufferedInputStream(new ByteArrayInputStream(...)) not sufficient? –  Jason C Aug 12 '13 at 18:56
    
There is no raw data access in my use case, hence the ByteReader interface described. –  PNS Aug 12 '13 at 19:00
1  
There was no need or assumption that you would write the code for me. Overriding the InputStream read(...) methods is the obvious solution and your approach is correct. I preferred to override the read(byte[]) method and reuse the buffers. Again, thanks for all the help. :-) –  PNS Aug 12 '13 at 23:58
1  
See my comment on your question. One consequence of the ByteReaders interface is that no matter how many layers of buffering you add on top, you will never be able to change the total number of read calls it takes to consume a stream. So, honestly, your best bet in terms of efficiency is to simply use ByteReader directly with nothing on top; the fact that it determines its own buffer size prevents all further buffering optimizations. I apologize for not spotting that earlier. –  Jason C Aug 13 '13 at 0:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.