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No one knows. And even if you work at Twitter, you probably won't let us know the secret.

So, let us all post our theories on how this communication tool database is designed!

It definitely can't follow the standard replication architecture, right? It's got to do some sharding, partitioning, etc, etc.

Let me know what you think!

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closed as too broad by Qantas 94 Heavy, Brad Koch, Mark Rotteveel, greg-449, Fönsi Jun 22 '14 at 8:49

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Twitter uses in memory database and MySQL is just for backup.

This is a diagram that might explain Twitter's architecture: alt text

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What are the differne types of cache? (I only use memcached for my caching..dead simple!) What is all of that stuff!? – TIMEX Nov 30 '09 at 12:15
    
They are explained in the document I linked above – Graviton Nov 30 '09 at 12:18

MySQL is not used for backup as mention in the previous answer but for actually storing the data.

They have developed their own database called FlockDB which uses mySQL as back-end database along with other mechanisms for consistency,indexing etc.

More information about FlockDB and source code here:

https://github.com/twitter/flockdb

But they have optimized their MySQL database schema in a way to perform extremely well with their queries.

More information about the schema here:

http://www.slideshare.net/nkallen/q-con-3770885?from=ss_embed

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