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Is there a way or technique to generate unique types or ids for each template instantiation at compile time?

For example this observer pattern:

#include <set>
#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
struct type2type {};    // maybe int2type


template<class T, class T_UNIQUE>
struct OBSERVER_BASE
{
  virtual void notify ( T, type2type< T_UNIQUE > ) = 0;
};

template<class T, class T_UNIQUE>
struct SUBJECT_BASE
{
  // This i like to do without the T_UNIQUE parameter
  typedef T_UNIQUE unique_type;

  std::set< OBSERVER_BASE< T, unique_type >* > my_observer{};

  void do_notify ()
  {
    for ( auto obs : my_observer )
      obs->notify ( T{}, type2type< unique_type >{} );
  }
};


class X {};
class Y {};
                                          // manual unique required?
class Subject_A : public SUBJECT_BASE< X, Subject_A > {};
class Subject_B : public SUBJECT_BASE< X, Subject_B > {};
class Subject_C : public SUBJECT_BASE< Y, Subject_C > {};

// typedef UNIQUE_. only to illustrate the idea 
typedef typename Subject_A::unique_type UNIQUE_A;
typedef typename Subject_B::unique_type UNIQUE_B;
typedef typename Subject_C::unique_type UNIQUE_C;

class Observer :
  public OBSERVER_BASE< X, UNIQUE_A >,
  public OBSERVER_BASE< X, UNIQUE_B >,
  public OBSERVER_BASE< Y, UNIQUE_C >
{
  virtual void notify ( X, type2type< UNIQUE_A > ) override
  {
    std::cout << "x from Subject_A" << std::endl;
  }

  virtual void notify ( X, type2type< UNIQUE_B > ) override
  {
    std::cout << "x from Subject_B" << std::endl;
  }

  virtual void notify ( Y, type2type< UNIQUE_C > ) override
  {
    std::cout << "y from Subject_C" << std::endl;
  }
};

int main ( int argc, char **argv )
{
  Subject_A sub_a {};
  Subject_B sub_b {};
  Subject_C sub_c {};

  Observer obs {};

  sub_a.my_observer.insert( &obs );
  sub_b.my_observer.insert( &obs );
  sub_c.my_observer.insert( &obs );

  sub_a.do_notify();
  sub_b.do_notify();
  sub_c.do_notify();
}

Is there a way to do it in this style ( without manual unique argument )? I know sounds strange...

template<class T>
struct SUBJECT_BASE
{
  typedef AUTOMATIC_UNIQUE_TYPE__OR__WHAT_EVER unique_type;
};

class Subject_A : public SUBJECT_BASE< X > {};
class Subject_B : public SUBJECT_BASE< X > {};
class Subject_C : public SUBJECT_BASE< Y > {};
share|improve this question
    
Can you use typeid(T), or std::type_index? –  Kerrek SB Aug 12 '13 at 21:05
1  
@KerrekSB: It seems the goal is that Subject_A and Subject_B have unique base classes although both use SUBJECT_BASE<X>. –  Dietmar Kühl Aug 12 '13 at 21:08
    
SUBJECT_BASE<T> is unique type. –  Cory Nelson Aug 12 '13 at 21:09
    
@Cory Nelson: But i want to use the T_UNIQUE to overload the notify method notify ( T, type2type< T_UNIQUE > ) <- not working if UNIQUE = SUBJECT_BASE<T> because T can be two or more times the same type. –  monotomy Aug 13 '13 at 15:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't think there's a way to achieve what you are asking for, but it's possible to achieve what you seem to want. This implementation doesn't need the manual UNIQUE_TYPE:

template<class T>
class Subject
{
  std::vector<std::function<void(T)>> observers;

public:
  void do_notify () {
    for ( auto& obs : observers )
      obs( T{} );
  }

  void add_listener(std::function<void(T)> l) {
      observers.emplace_back(std::move(l));
  }
};

class X {};
class Y {};

int main ()
{
  Subject<X> sub_a {};
  Subject<X> sub_b {};
  Subject<Y> sub_c {};

  sub_a.add_listener([](X){std::cout << "x from Subject_A" << std::endl;});
  sub_b.add_listener([](X){std::cout << "x from Subject_B" << std::endl;});
  sub_c.add_listener([](Y){std::cout << "y from Subject_C" << std::endl;});

  sub_a.do_notify();
  sub_b.do_notify();
  sub_c.do_notify();
}

But it's substantially less OOP-ey than your posted code. (Live at Coliru)

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good solution for the observer pattern. And we don't need a observer base class and no virtual methods. ( Code @ Coliru based on Casey -> a version with observer class ) –  monotomy Aug 13 '13 at 14:50

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