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I have a table that holds information about when a person is on leave. The two key fields are are:

**SQL

StartDate DATE NOT NULL,
EndDate DATE NULL

Within my .Net code, these are stored as DateTime types.

So, if a user has holiday from 13th of August, until 13th of August, thats 1 days leave. The dates should be inclusive, with the Start being at 0:00 (Midnight), and then EndDate being 23:59.59 basically.

So, depending on if it's Start, or End, they're treated slightly differently.

My system works with whole days. i.e. DATE values. I don't use Time at all, but am forced to because of the DateTime type in .Net. But they're all set to midnight when reading from the database.

The code I am focusing on, that isn't working, is this:

public string AvailableToday
    {
        get
        {
            if (NonAvailibility != null)
            {
                var i = NonAvailibility.FirstOrDefault(t => DateTime.UtcNow <= t.EndDate && DateTime.UtcNow >= t.StartDate);
                if (i != null) return i.NonAvailibilityType ;
                return "";
            }
            return "";
        }
    }

The point of that code, is to return the reason for the person not being available today. If the person IS available, I should return an empty string.

The problem is, my user that I am testing with, has leave fromthe 12th of August, to the 13th of August.

That should be two full days. But because DateTime.UtcNow returns the current date with time, and we're into the 13th now... the code is saying that he is not on leave today.

A fix may be to just add one day to the EndDate value? So, instead of 12th of Aug to the 13th of Aug, it will check from the 12th of Aug, to the 14th midnight. That seems hacky, but may be my only solution. Or, truncate the DateTime.UtcNow to set it to midnight, and then change the check to:

t => DateTime.UtcNow <= t.EndDate && SetToMidnight(DateTime.UtcNow) >= t.StartDate

(Or, instead of using that 'SetToMidnight....', just use DateTime.UtcNow.Date)

Is there a better way to handle this solution, or do I need to do one of the above possible solutions?

(Note, TimeZones and all that is being handled in another question) 10th

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Could you not use ToShortDateString() in order to get only the Date portion without the time? –  Edper Aug 13 '13 at 0:29
    
@Edper, I think that's more for display, and then you have to do string compare. TO remove the time portion, I think DateTime.UtcNow.Date does the job, which returns a date without the time factor. Well, it does have a time, but it's midnight. –  Craig Aug 13 '13 at 0:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try DateTime.UtcNow.Date

public string AvailableToday
{
    get
    {
        if (NonAvailibility != null)
        {
            var i = NonAvailibility.FirstOrDefault(t => DateTime.UtcNow.Date <= t.EndDate && DateTime.UtcNow.Date >= t.StartDate);
            if (i != null) return i.NonAvailibilityType ;
            return "";
        }
        return "";
    }
}

I hope this will help.

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1  
Note, this only works if EndDate and StartDate do not have a time portion to them. I know they don't in this case, but it is a important fact to know if someone else uses this code in the future (or he changes his schema to use datetime instead of date in the database). However just throwing .Date on StartTime and EndTime would fix that too (again not needed here, but if you do ever store times, you will need it) –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 13 '13 at 1:12

i had this problem before and you will find that t => DateTime.UtcNow <= t.EndDate doens't work perfectly ,so i added +1 to the end date in order to make it work,also you can make your fields in database to DateTime instead of Date only,it's better to keep the variable in "code" and "database" same type

  1. Change your database type to DateTime
  2. I solved this issue like you said by adding +1 to end date
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