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I am reading a C book and don't understand a statement it is asking me to evaluate.

Here is the statement, !(1 && !(0 || 1))

I can understand some things here... This is what I have so far, not(1 and not(0 or 1))

So it's not 1 and not 0 or 1? Or is it not 1 and 0 or 1? Do those two ! cancel each other out like a double negative? The answer is true but I expected false.

Can someone explain?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. (0 || 1) == 1
  2. !1 == 0
  3. 1 && 0 == 0
  4. !0 == 1 also known as true :)

Keep in mind that || and && are short circuit operators, but in this case you still have to evaluate the right side because the operators do not short circuit

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Ah... So start from the inner parenthesis, going along using 1 as true and 0 as false until you get to the outside? Correct? –  user2677183 Aug 13 '13 at 4:25
    
Stuff inside parenthesis is not evaluated first; the order of evaluation with logical operators is strictly left-to-right associative according to the C standard. –  verbose Aug 13 '13 at 4:27
    
Got it, thanks! –  user2677183 Aug 13 '13 at 4:27
    
@aaronman Thanks a lot. If I had the rep to up-vote I would. –  user2677183 Aug 13 '13 at 4:36
    
@henry now you can:) –  Pandiyan Cool Aug 13 '13 at 4:38

Use De Morgan's law to simplify the original expression: !(1 && !(0 || 1)). When you negate a parenthetical logical expression, the negation is applied to each operand and the operator is changed.

!(1 && !(0 || 1))   // original expression
!1 || !!(O || 1)    // by De Morgan's law
!1 || (0 || 1)      // the two !!'s in front of the second operand cancel each other
0 || (0 || 1)       // !1 is zero
0 || 1              // the second operand, 0 || 1, evaluates to true because 1 is true
1                   // the entire expression is now 0 || 1, which is true

The answer is true.

A couple of other answers have said that the parentheses determine order of evaluation. That is wrong. In C, precedence is not the same as order of evaluation. Precedence determines which operands are grouped by which operators. The exact order of evaluation is unspecified. The logical operators are an exception: they are evaluated in strictly left-to-right order in order to enable short-circuit behavior.

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!(1 && !(0 || 1))           =>     not(1 and not(0 or 1))
not(1 and not(0 or 1))      =>     not(1 and (0 and 1))      // !(a or b) = a and b
not(1 and (0 and 1))        =>     not(0)    =>  1  =>  true
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   !(1 && !(0 || 1))
=> ! (1 && !(1))     //0 || 1 is 1
=> ! (1 && 0)        // !1 is 0
=> !0                // 1 && 0 is 0
=> 1                 // !0 is 1
=>true
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(0 || 1) --> 1

! 1      --> 0

1 && 0   --> 0

! 0     -- > 1

Answer true

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if A =1 A && B = B. So the final expression inside !(....) is !(!(0 || 1)) which is 0 || 1 and 0 + 1 =1 hence answer is true

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!(1 && !(0 || 1))  =>  !(1 && !(1)) =>  !(1 && !1)  => !(1 && 0) => !(0) => !0 => 1(true) 
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Starting from the deepest nesting and working outwards adding piece by piece;

(0 || 1) = (0 OR 1) = 1

!(0 || 1) = !1 = NOT 1 = 0

1 && !(0 || 1) = 1 && 0 = 1 AND 0 = 0

!(1 && !(0 || 1)) = !0 = NOT 0 = 1
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To evaluate this, start with the innermost parentheses and work your way out like so:

not(1 and not(0 or 1)) -> not(1 and not(1)) -> not(1 and 0) -> not(0) -> 1 -> true.
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!(1 && !(0 || 1))

since 0 || 1 evaluates as 1, is the same as

!(1 && !1)

continue

!(1 && 0)

continue

!0

so it's 1, true.

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It easy if you remember about which operation order

 !(1 && !(0 || 1)) = !(1 && !(1)) = !(1 && 0) = !(0) = 1
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