Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on a tool to log on a motorolla modem, i get it working and display the output on the python console, this tool have 2 part one part with the gui and the button, label and text frame. i would like to get the output displayed on the Gui and not to the console. how can i get that done

here is the files :


from Tkinter import * import motorola

class Application(object): def init(self):

    self.fen = Tk()
    self.fen.title("Motorola tool V 0.1")
    self.fen.geometry("720x480")


    Label(self.fen,
          text = "IP address").grid(row=0)
    #self.entree = MaxLengthEntry(self.fen, maxlength=5)
    self.entree1 = Entry(self.fen)
    self.entree1.grid(row=0, column=1)

    Label(self.fen,
          text = "Password").grid(row=2)
    #self.entree = MaxLengthEntry(self.fen, maxlength=5)
    self.entree2 = Entry(self.fen)
    self.entree2.grid(row=2, column=1)

    Button(self.fen, text = 'Connect',
           command = self.launch).grid(row = 3, column=2)

    Button(self.fen, text = 'Disconect',
           command = self.exits).grid(row = 3, column=3)
    Button(self.fen, text = 'Quit',
           command = self.fen.quit).grid(row = 5, sticky = E)


    self.output = Text(self.fen)
    self.output.grid(row = 7, column = 1)

    self.fen.mainloop()  



def launch(self):
    self.ip = self.entree1.get()
    self.passw = self.entree2.get()
    print self.ip, self.passw
    if self.passw == "":
        self.entree2.config(bg = 'red')
        self.fen.after(1000, self.empty)

    else:
        self.f = motorola.Motorola(self.ip, self.passw)
        self.f.sh_dsl()

def empty(self):
    self.entree2.configure(bg='white')


def exits(self):
    try:
        self.f.disconnect()
    except AttributeError:
        print "You are not connected"

a = Application()

motorola file :

class Motorola(object): def init(self, ip, passw):

    self.ip = ip
    self.passw = passw

    print "connect on the modem"
    self.tn = telnetlib.Telnet(self.ip, '2323' , timeout =5)
    self. tn.read_until("login: ")
    self.tn.write('radadmin\r\n')
    self.tn.read_until("Password:")
    self.tn.write(self.passw+"\r\n")
    data = self.tn.read_until(">")
    print "you are connected"
    print data,

def disconnect(self):

    self.tn.close()
    print "disconnect from the modem"

import telnetlib


once i connect on the modem with the button which launch motorola module, how can the data could be displayed on the frame text of the gui module ?

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
your code is all messed up. Some of it appears as code, some appears as regular text. Please fix the code so people can read it. –  Bryan Oakley Aug 13 '13 at 10:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The basic idea is that you have to replace each print with some code that adds the string to the GUI.

The trick is that a Motorola instance probably doesn't know how to do that. So, what you want to do is pass it something—self, or self.output, or best of all, a function (closure) that appends to self.output. Then the Motorola code doesn't have to know anything about Tk (and doesn't have to change if you later write a wx GUI); it just has a function it can call to output a string. For example:

def outputter(msg):
    self.output.insert(END, msg + "\n")
self.f = motorola.Motorola(self.ip, self.passw, outputter)

Then, inside the Motorola object, just store that parameter and call it everywhere you were using print:

def __init__(self, ip, passw, outputter):
    self.outputter = outputter
    # ...
    self.outputter("connect on the modem")

That almost does it, but how you do handle the magic trailing comma of the print function, or even simple things like multiple arguments or printing out numbers? Well, you just need to make outputter a little smarter. You could look at the interface of the Python 3 print function for inspiration:

def outputter(*msgs, **kwargs):
    sep = kwargs.get("sep", " ")
    end = kwargs.get("end", "\n")
    self.output.insert(END, sep.join(msgs) + end)

You could go farther—converting non-strings to strings (but not breaking Unicode), etc.—but really, why? If you're trying to get too fancy with print or with your outputter function, you probably want to let str.format do the heavy lifting instead…

Anyway, now, instead of:

print data,

You do:

self.outputter(data, end='')

And all of your other print statements are trivial.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello Abarnet,Thank you so much for your prompt answer, i was not expected for such a quick answer. –  neonet Aug 13 '13 at 5:22
    
@neonet: If you understand it, and it works for you, accept it. If there's anything you don't understand, ask first and I'll improve it. –  abarnert Aug 13 '13 at 5:23
    
Yes it is clear for me thks again :) –  neonet Aug 13 '13 at 5:28
    
Hello, i have one more question, this working perfectly, and displaying properly on the text widget, however when i copy and paste the result on a word or a IE form every each line i have like a nous line added... Do you know where it come from ? –  neonet Aug 20 '13 at 4:42
    
@neonet: What is "a nous line"? You mean there's an extra copy of each line of text? A blank line between each one? Some kind of graphical line-drawing character at the end of each line of text? –  abarnert Aug 20 '13 at 17:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.