Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm relatively new here but i thought if anyone could help it would be someone on here.

We're doing a program with atomic lattice simulations on a very large scale and this very simple function is used so many times that it's significantly slowing down the process.

It simply checks the types (part of a 3d vector of structures called lattice, including an integer t representing type of atom) of the 8 neighbours (we're in BCC) of a site in a periodic lattice.

I realise it may be impossible to streamline it much more but if anyone has any inspiration let me know, thanks!

//calculates number of neighbours that aren't vacancies
int neighbour(int i, int j, int k)
{
//cout << "neighbour" << endl;
int n = 0;

if (V != lattice[(i+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][(j+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][k].t)
{
    n++;
}
if (V != lattice[(i+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][(j-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][k].t)
{
    n++;
}
if (V != lattice[(i+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][j][k+1].t)
{
    n++;
}
if (V != lattice[(i+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][j][k-1].t)
{
    n++;
}
if (V != lattice[(i-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][(j+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][k].t)
{
    n++;
}
if (V != lattice[(i-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][(j-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][k].t)
{
    n++;
}
if (V != lattice[(i-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][j][k+1].t)
{
    n++;
}
if (V != lattice[(i-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][j][k-1].t)
{
    n++;
}

return n;
}
share|improve this question
    
You can probably pick up some hints from (of all places) clever implementations of John Conway's Game of Life (which is pretty close to a 2D version of the same idea). One that's well known: handle the edges separately from the rest, to eliminate the & (LATTIC_SIZE-1) term. –  Jerry Coffin Aug 13 '13 at 6:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, the lattice wrapping solution in use ((i+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)) works properly only if LATTICE_SIZE is a power of 2. E.g., if LATTICE_SIZE == 100 and i == 99, (i+1)&(LATTICE_SIZE-1) == 100 & 99 == 0x64 & 0x63 == 0x60 == 96, while the expected value is 0.

Given that, I would advise you to check the way multidimensional array indexing works with your compiler and platform. With LATTICE_SIZE equal to a power of 2, multiplication of nth index can be effectively replaced with left shift which is significantly faster on some architectures. VC++11 does this optimization automatically, however I do not know what your compiler is and cannot assume it does that as well.

Another improvement that comes to mind is try to avoid recalculation of offsets from higher order indices. Optimizer can be helped in achieving that if we group same higher order indices together. I have achieved that just by sorting the expressions:

if (V != lattice[(i+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][(j+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][k  ].t)  n++;
if (V != lattice[(i+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][j                       ][k+1].t)  n++;
if (V != lattice[(i+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][j                       ][k-1].t)  n++;
if (V != lattice[(i+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][(j-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][k  ].t)  n++;
if (V != lattice[(i-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][(j+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][k  ].t)  n++;
if (V != lattice[(i-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][j                       ][k+1].t)  n++;
if (V != lattice[(i-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][j                       ][k-1].t)  n++;
if (V != lattice[(i-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][(j-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][k  ].t)  n++;

My optimizer has taken advantage of that, the resulting speedup was only 4%. However for your system it may come down to a different value.

Also, much of the optimization really depends on uses of your function. For example, I wrote a simple test like that:

volatile int n = 0;
for ( int i = 0; i != LATTICE_SIZE; ++i )
    for ( int j = 0; j != LATTICE_SIZE; ++j )
        for ( int k = 0; k != LATTICE_SIZE; ++k )
            n += neighbour ( i, j, k );

My measurement showed something around 12 ns per neighbour() call. After that I have noticed that neighbours are only checked in only two high order planes. I refactored the function to give more explicit hint to the optimizer:

int neighbour_in_plane ( elem_t l[LATTICE_SIZE][LATTICE_SIZE], int j, int k )
{
    int n = 0;
    if (V != l[(j-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][k  ].t)  n++;
    if (V != l[j                       ][k-1].t)  n++;
    if (V != l[j                       ][k+1].t)  n++;
    if (V != l[(j+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)][k  ].t)  n++;
    return n;
}

//calculates number of neighbours that aren't vacancies
int neighbour(int i, int j, int k)
{
    return neighbour_in_plane ( lattice[(i-1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)], i, j ) +
           neighbour_in_plane ( lattice[(i+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)], i, j );
}

And surprisingly saw only 4 ns per call. I checked the compiler output and saw that this time it has inlined both functions into the calling loops and made a number of optimizations for me. E.q. it effectively moved two inner loops into neighbour_in_plane() function, thus avoiding thousands of recalculations of the lattice[(i-+1) & (LATTICE_SIZE-1)] expressions.

The bottomline is that you have to play with this function in your code+compiler+platform environment to make the most speed out of it.

share|improve this answer
    
I idly wonder if coliru.stacked-crooked.com/… would give any speedup. I doubt it, but I wonder. –  Mooing Duck Aug 21 '13 at 20:28

I assume, that LATTICE_SIZE is a power of 2. Otherwiese, the & (LATTICE_SIZE-1) won't do the wraparound as you want it. Furthermore, I notice, that the "k" dimension does not wrap. Is that on purpose?

Then, in C++, execution time of that code will largely depend on what type of "array" your "lattice" is, and how expensive or cheap the comparison V != lattice[i][i][k].t is. Generally, nested std::vector or boost::multi_array are likely to be way slower than a conventional "C" array: Lattice lattice[LATTICE_SIZE][LATTICE_SIZE][LATTICE_SIZE]

If you can afford to leave an empty border in all three dimensions (basically an empty surface), then that is likely to help with efficiency, as you can leave out all that wrap-arounds with & (LATTICE_SIZE-1). If you have a compile-time constant LATTICE_SIZE, the calculation of exact indices like lattice[i-1][j][k+1] is a lot faster without those wraps, as the compiler can determine constant offsets between your various array accesses.

Last, but not least, I recommend that you have a look at the generated assembler output for that function (just compile with the -S switch and look at the generated .s file). If the compiler translates the "if" into conditional jumps around the "n++" (which is converted to inc %reg), then that leaves room for further optimization, because conditional jumps tend to be mispredicted by the CPU and then cause a lot of extra clock cycles. If a cmov is used, or if the result of the "if" is converted to a register via the conditional set directives (like setc or setg), the code is likely already more close to optimum. To help the compiler use the setxx operations on Intel x86 efficiently, you might try to convert the result count "n" to an "unsigned char".

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.