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I have the following structure:

typedef Memory_managed_data_structure T_MYDATA;
std::vector<T_MYDATA *> object_container;
std::vector<T_MYDATA *> multiple_selection;
T_MYDATA * simple_selection;

Edit: this may be very important: the Memory_managed_data_structure contains, among other things, a bitter, raw pointer to some other data.

It aims to be a very simple representation of an original container of memory managed objects (object_container) and then a "multiple_selection" array (for selecting many objects in the range and doing various operations with them) and a "simple_selection" pointer (for doing these operations on a single object).

The lifetime of all objects is managed by the object_container while multiple_selection and simple_selection just point to some of them. multiple_selection and simple_selection can be nullified as needed and only object_container objects can be deleted.

The system works just fine but I am trying to get into shared_ptrs right now and would like to change the structure to something like:

typedef Memory_managed_data_structure T_MYDATA;
std::vector<std::shared_ptr<T_MYDATA> > object_container;
std::vector<std::shared_ptr<T_MYDATA> > multiple_selection;
std::shared_ptr<T_MYDATA> simple_selection;

Again, the object container would be the "owner" and the rest would just point to them. My question is, would this scheme wreak havok in the application?. Is there something I should know before snowballing into these changes?. Are not shared_ptr the appropriate kind of pointer here?.

I can somewhat guarantee that no object would exists in multiple_selection or simple_selection if it is not in object_container first. Of course, no delete is ever called in multiple_selection or simple_selection.

Thanks for your time.

Edit: Forgot to mention, never used any of these automated pointers before so I may be wildly confused about their uses. Any tips and rules of thumb will be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
If the object container is to be the owner, then std::shared_ptr is not the right smart pointer. – juanchopanza Aug 13 '13 at 7:07
    
Just realised and edited the question... Any tips about what kind of structures can I use for the owner and for those who borrow from it?. – The Marlboro Man Aug 13 '13 at 7:08
1  
std::unique_ptr is for unique ownership. That means that when the owning container goes out of scope, all the managed pointers will be deleted. If the container is to own the pointers, then it is up to you to make sure they do not get used after the container goes out of scope, or erases its elements. – juanchopanza Aug 13 '13 at 7:12
    
I could use those then in the real container... What about the ones that borrow from it?. Is there anything out there that sidesteps raw pointers?. Thanks a lot for your time Juanchpoanza. – The Marlboro Man Aug 13 '13 at 7:48
    
Use raw pointers for the containers that borrow from object_container. Just make sure that these containers don't outlive object_container. – Sebastian Redl Aug 13 '13 at 9:32
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You say, that the object container would be the "owner" of the objects in question. In that case, that you have a clear owning relationship, using std::shared_ptr is not ideal. Rather, stick with what you have.

However, if you cannot guarantee, that a pointer has been removed from multiple_selection and/or simple_selection before it is deleted, you have to act. One possible action could be, that you use shared_ptr. In that case, an object could still continue to exist in one of the selections, even, if it is removed (via shared_ptr::reset or just assigning a null value) from object_container.

The other alternative is to make sure, that objects get removed thoroughly: If something is to be deleted, remove ALL references to it from the selections and from the object_container, and THEN delete it. If you strictly follow this scheme, you don't need the overhead of shared_ptr.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Kai. I can assure there is a clear owning relationship there, also, the code works just as you described: thoroughly removing every single reference before anything is changed in the original vector. Thing is, I really want to learn the C++11 way of doing things and I wonder if there is any combination of smart pointers that models the owner - borrowers relationshipt. Some useful tips are given in other comments but any other is welcome. – The Marlboro Man Aug 13 '13 at 8:02
    
Chosen as right answer. Not that the rest is wrong, but because I will follow its advice to stick with what I have: just tried starting and the snowball effect was daunting. – The Marlboro Man Aug 13 '13 at 12:19

I can somewhat guarantee that no object would exists in multiple_selection or simple_selection if it is not in object_container first.

If you 150% sure, than there is no need for smart ptr.

Reason you may need it in this situation is debug, I think. In case you describe - multiple_selection and simple_selection is not shared_ptr, but weak_ptr.

Code with error:

  std::vector<int*> owner_vector;
  std::vector<int*> weak_vector;

  int* a = new int(3);

  owner_vector.push_back(a);
  weak_vector.push_back(a);

  std::for_each(
      owner_vector.begin(),
      owner_vector.end(),
      [](int* ptr) {
        delete ptr;
      }
  );

  std::for_each(
      weak_vector.begin(),
      weak_vector.end(),
      [](int* ptr) {
        *ptr = 3; // oops... usage of deleted pointer
      }
  );

You can catch it with smart pointers:

  std::vector<std::shared_ptr<int>> owner_vector;
  std::vector<std::weak_ptr<int>> weak_vector;

  {
    auto a = std::make_shared<int>();

    owner_vector.push_back(a);
    weak_vector.push_back(a);
  }

  std::for_each(
      owner_vector.begin(),
      owner_vector.end(),
      [](std::shared_ptr<int>& ptr) {
        ptr.reset(); // memory delete
      }
  );

  std::for_each(
      weak_vector.begin(),
      weak_vector.end(),
      [](std::weak_ptr<int>& ptr) {
        assert(!ptr.expired()); // guarantee to be alive
        auto shared_ptr = ptr.lock();
        *shared_ptr = 3;
      }
  );

In last example you will have assert failed, but not undefined/segmentation fault. In not debug case you can disable shared_ptr overhead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the thorough examples. I am adding them to my personal reference file right now. I just commented below that I am sure they won't be used when deleted since every change in the owning vector is followed by empty / setting the borrowers to null. You mention the weak_ptr and I just read the somewhat cryptic (to me) reference... Could that model the "I borrow this resource" relationship?. Kai below suggested keeping the current scheme (tried and true) and I may just do that if that's a reasonable solution. Any tips?. Thanks a lot. – The Marlboro Man Aug 13 '13 at 8:06
    
I don't think borrow is the right term for describing shared/weak ownership. (May be weak_ptr::lock it closest for borrow?) You can read resources: weak_ptr, boost::weak_ptr, boost::shared_ptr and this of course (: – ruslo Aug 13 '13 at 8:18

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