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I keep running into a recurring issue with my application. Basically, I have certain code that I want it to run when it first starts up the server to check whether certain things have been defined e.g. a schedule, particular columns in the database, existence of files, etc. and then act accordingly.

However, I definitely don't want this code to run when I'm starting a Rake task (or doing a 'generate', etc. For example, I don't want the database fields to be checked under Rake because the Rake task might be the migration to define the fields. Another example, I have a dynamic schedule for Resque but I don't want to load that when starting the Resque workers. And so on and so forth...

And I definitely need the Rake tasks to be loading the environment!

Is there any way of determining how the application has been loaded? I do want to run the code when its loaded via 'rails server', Apache/Passenger, console, etc. but not at other times.

If not, where or how could you define this code to ensure it is only executed in the manner described above?

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1 Answer

The easiest way is checking some environment variable in your initialization code with something like

if ENV['need_complex_init']
  do_complex_init     
end

and running application with need_complex_init=1 rails s

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How do you pass need_complex_init to production server? –  maximus Aug 13 '13 at 8:46
    
That depends on the server you use, all of them have some way to alter the environment. E.g. Apache has SetEnv directive. –  synapse Aug 13 '13 at 8:48
    
Ok, so there is no built-in way to detect how it is running then? I was hoping to have a method that doesn't require people to remember to include an environment flag every time they want to execute the code –  richard Aug 13 '13 at 23:53
    
@reagleton you can walk up the callstack and/or process tree and determine how exactly you got to some functions, but really it's not worth the effort. –  synapse Aug 14 '13 at 9:15
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