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I have number 8939, then I want to get the array [8000,7000,6000,5000,4000,3000,2000,1000] and example if I have 340 then I can get the array 300,200,100.

I just knew that , if I user

i = i/1000 * 1000

Then I can round down 8939 to 8000, but I don't know how can I got the result that I want above.

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2  
What does "get the array of the number" mean? –  Alex Wayne Aug 13 '13 at 8:03
    
I'm sorry, my bad. I edited. –  Nothing Aug 13 '13 at 8:03
    
What is your question? –  putvande Aug 13 '13 at 8:06
1  
You may want to start with the JavaScript Math.log() function; that gives a logarithmic value that will give you (in simple terms) the number of zeros that you need in each value of your array. –  Adrian Wragg Aug 13 '13 at 8:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No reason to complicate it, you can use a for loop

function getArrForNum(num){
   var arr = []; // create a new array
   var digitNum = num.toString().length; //get the number of digits, can use Math.log instead
   var mulOf10 = Math.pow(10,digitNum-1);
   for(var i=1;i*mulOf10 < num;i++){
       arr.push(i*mulOf10); // push the next multiple of 1000
   }
   return arr; //return it
}

Then you can use it:

getArrForNum(3211); //1000,2000,3000
getArrForNum(321); //100,200,300

Here is a one line version just for the challenge, but I strongly suggest avoiding it :)

Array(+(832+"")[0]).join(".").split(".").map(function(_,i){ return (i+1)*Math.pow(10,(832+"").length-1);}); // 800,700,600,500,400,300,200,100

Array(+(3332+"")[0]).join(".").split(".").map(function(_,i){ return (i+1)*Math.pow(10,(3332+"").length-1);}); //1000,2000,3000
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Here is a one liner just to show possibility: new Array((8321/1000) | 0).join(".").split(".").map(function(_,i){ return (i+1)*1000});, but seriously, use a simple for loop, it's much more readable. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 13 '13 at 8:07
    
Yup Thanks :D i totally missread the question. –  C5H8NNaO4 Aug 13 '13 at 8:11
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum, yeah your function is great. But if getArrForNum(300) , 1000 is replaced with 100. So how can we determine whether it is thousand or hundred here. I want 1000 is a dynamic value. –  Nothing Aug 13 '13 at 8:15
    
@Nothing test it –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 13 '13 at 8:16
    
This function produces wrong result for 20. getArrForNum(20) gives [10], where it should actually produce [20, 10]. –  kadaj Aug 13 '13 at 8:26

The following will do what you require:

    function getArray(value) {

        var valueOrder = Math.floor( Math.log(value)  / Math.log(10) );
        var result = [];
        var step = Math.pow (10, valueOrder);
        var currentValue = step;

        while (currentValue < value) {
            result.push (currentValue);
            currentValue += step;
        }

        return result.reverse();    
    }

Demonstration here: http://jsfiddle.net/5zXc5/

    getArray(8939) => 8000,7000,6000,5000,4000,3000,2000,1000
    getArray(340) => 300,200,100

You haven't mentioned edge cases (e.g. 1000), but those can be handled easily enough by altering the < to a <= in the while, or adjusting the call to Math.floor.

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function f(a) {
    var len = a.toString().length,
        m = Math.pow(10, len - 1),
        e = a.toString().charAt(0),
        num = e * m,
        i = 1
        out = [];
    for (i = 0; i < e; i++) {
      out.push(num - i * m);
    }
    return out;
}

f(8939); // [8000, 7000, 6000, 5000, 4000, 3000, 2000, 1000]  
f(340);  // [300, 200, 100]  
f(0);    // []
f(10);   // [10]
f(20);   // [20, 10]
f(70);   // [70, 60, 50, 40, 30, 20, 10]
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function g(n){
    var p = Math.floor(Math.log(n)/Math.log(10)), // n.toString().length - 1 is cool (in others' answers).
        m = Math.pow(10,p),
        d = Math.floor(n/m),
        r = [];
    for(; d>0; d--){
        r.push(d*m);
    }
    return r;
}

g(8939); // [8000, 7000, 6000, 5000, 4000, 3000, 2000, 1000]
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Just a fun fact, you can use Math.LN10 instead of Math.log(10) –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 13 '13 at 8:24
function mine(num){
var result =[];
var count  = 0;
var i = num;
var f;
while(i!=0){
i = Math.floor(i/10);
count++;
}
f = Math.floor(num/Math.pow(10,count-1));
for(i =f;i>=1 && count>1;i--){
result.push(i*Math.pow(10,count-1));
}
return result;
}

mine(8939); // [8000, 7000, 6000, 5000, 4000, 3000, 2000, 1000]
mine(340); // [300, 200, 100]
mine(0); // []
mine(10); // [10]
mine(20); // [20, 10]
mine(70); // [70, 60, 50, 40, 30, 20, 10]

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