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Introduction

I started using Pandoc markdown to generate static XHTML for my personal website. I managed to automatically insert a couple of links that refer to the $(NAME) of the .md file using the Pandoc -B argument (see below makefile). This Pandoc -B argument is actually designed to contain a file name, so I had to use an output redirection of the echo command in addition to shell interpretation.

The problem

The Pandoc -B argument has grown too long to be easily maintained within the makefile. I want to move the XHTML string back to a separate file whilst keeping the Bash string interpretation. The cat command would not do it because it is not a part of Bash.

SHELL := /bin/bash
NAME  = $(basename $(wildcard *.md))

all: index.html
html: index.html

index.html: $(NAME).md
pandoc $< -S -o $@ \
-B <(echo "<div id=\"PDF\"><ul><li><a href=\"$(NAME).a4.pdf\">A4 PDF</a></li><li><a href=\"$(NAME).letter.pdf\">Letter PDF</a></li></ul></div><div id=\"source\"><ul><li><a href=\"../$(NAME).bib\">BibTeX references</a></li><li><a href=\"$(NAME).md\">Pandoc MarkDown</a></li><li><a href=\"makefile\">makefile</a></li></ul></div>")
share|improve this question

How bout using sed with a template? For example, this is the file and the word templates are {__NAME__}:

<div id="PDF"><ul><li><a href="{__NAME__}.a4.pdf">A4 PDF</a></li><li><a href="{__NAME__}.letter.pdf">Letter PDF</a></li></ul></div><div id="source"><ul><li><a href="../{__NAME__}.bib">BibTeX references</a></li><li><a href="{__NAME__}.md">Pandoc MarkDown</a></li><li><a href="makefile">makefile</a></li></ul></div>

You could use sed to replace them:

pandoc $< -S -o $@ \
-B <(sed -e "s|{__NAME__}|$(NAME)|g" file.txt)
share|improve this answer

You can read whole file into variable, and then replace all $(NAME) occurrences using $(subst).

SHELL := /bin/bash
NAME  := $(basename $(wildcard *.md))
TEMPLATE := $(shell cat template.html)

all: index.html
html: index.html

index.html: $(NAME).md
    pandoc $< -S -o $@ -B <<< "$(subst $$(NAME),$(NAME),$(TEMPLATE))"

Or of you want to resolve all variables in template file, replace the last file as follows:

pandoc $< -S -o $@ -B <<< "$(eval RESULT:=$(TEMPLATE))$(RESULT)"

template.html:

<div id="PDF"><ul><li><a href="$(NAME).a4.pdf">A4 PDF</a></li><li><a href="$(NAME).letter.pdf">Letter PDF</a></li></ul></div><div id="source"><ul><li><a href="../$(NAME).bib">BibTeX references</a></li><li><a href="$(NAME).md">Pandoc MarkDown</a></li><li><a href="makefile">makefile</a></li></ul></div>
share|improve this answer
    
pandoc $< -S -o $@ -B <<< "$(eval RESULT:=$(TEMPLATE))$(RESULT)" results in pandoc: option `-B' requires an argument FILENAME. I am very interested though in making this work since the resulting solution will be more general than the sed solution. – Serge Stroobandt Aug 15 '13 at 12:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I came to appreciate the edited answer of loentar since it would be more general than the sed solution. The the solution proposed by loentar would not only interpret $(NAME) variables in template files, but also all kinds of other Bash variables and commands.

Nonetheless, the solution proposed by loentar does not work with pandoc for the following reasons:

  1. Bash command <<< creates a here string whereas arguments -B and -A require files. <(echo string) corrects this problem.
  2. The other problem is that Bash will expand all double quotes in the before.html and after.html template files, resulting in an unvalidated XHTML file. To solve this, sed 's/"/\\"/g' escapes all double quotes with a backslash in advance of the Bash interpretation.

A solution that does work is therefore:

SHELL := /bin/bash
NAME  := $(basename $(wildcard *.md))
BEFORE := $(shell sed 's/"/\\"/g' before.html)
AFTER := $(shell sed 's/"/\\"/g' after.html)

all: index.html
html: index.html

index.html: $(NAME).md
    pandoc $< -S -o $@ \
    -B <(echo "$(eval RESULT:=$(BEFORE))$(RESULT)") \
    -A <(echo "$(eval RESULT:=$(AFTER))$(RESULT)")

with before.html for example:

<div id="PDF">
    <img src="../../images/pdf.png" alt="PDF" width="34" />
    <ul>
        <li><a href="$(NAME).a4.pdf">A4 PDF</a></li>
        <li><a href="$(NAME).letter.pdf">Letter PDF</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>
<div id="source">
    <ul>
        <li><a href="../$(NAME).bib">BibTeX references</a></li>
        <li><a href="$(NAME).md">Pandoc MarkDown</a></li>
        <li><a href="makefile">makefile</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
1  
To make your Makefile slightly more readable you can use single quotes and standard '/' separator: AFTER := $(shell sed 's/"/\\"/g' after.html). Slash is used as separator when source and destination strings does not contain many slashes (in common cases). Really you can use any char (that does not contain source or destination string) as separator, but common slash is more readable. – loentar Aug 15 '13 at 21:00
    
@loentar OK, I changed sed -e "s|\"|\\\\\"|g" to sed 's/"/\\"/g' in my answer. Thanks. – Serge Stroobandt Aug 15 '13 at 21:53

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