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I am using dependency injection for quite some time and I really like the technique, but I often have a problem of too many dependencies that should be injected 4 - 5 which seems to much.

But I cannot find a way to make it simpler. For instance I have a class with some business logic that sends messages, it accepts two other business logic dependencies to do what is needed (one to translate data to messages sent, and one to translate messages that are received).

But apart from this it needs some "technical" dependencies like ILogger, ITimerFactory (because it needs to create timers inside), IKeyGenerator (to generate unique keys).

So the whole list grows pretty big. Are there any good common ways to reduce the number of dependencies?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One way to handle those is to refactor towards Aggregates (or Facades). Mark Seemann wrote a good article on it, check it out (actually I highly recommend his book as well, just saying). So say you have the following (as taken from the article):

public OrderProcessor(IOrderValidator validator,
                      IOrderShipper shipper,
                      IAccountsReceivable receivable,
                      IRateExchange exchange,
                      IUserContext userContext)

You can refactor it to:

public OrderProcessor(IOrderValidator validator,
                      IOrderShipper shipper,
                      IOrderCollector collector)

Where OrderCollector is a facade (it wraps the previous 3 dependencies):

public OrderCollector(IAccountsReceivable receivable,
                      IRateExchange exchange,
                      IUserContext userContext)

I hope this helps.

EDIT

In terms of the cross-cutting concerns (logging and caching for example) and a strategy to handle them, here is a suggestion (that's what I usually do), say you have the following:

public interface IOrderService
{
    void DoAwesome();
}

public class OrderService : IOrderService
{
    public void DoAwesome()
    {
        // do your thing here ... no logging no nothing
    }
}

Here I'd use the decorator pattern to create an OrderService that has logging enabled:

public class OrderServiceWithLogging : IOrderService
{
    private readonly IOrderService _orderService;
    private readonly ILogger _logger;

    public OrderServiceWithLogging(IOrderService orderService, ILogger logger)
    {
        _orderService = orderService;
        _logger = logger;
    }

    public void DoAwesome()
    {
        _orderService.DoAwesome();
        _logger.Log("Awesome is done!");
    }
}

It might look like a bit of overhead but IMHO, it's clean and testable.

Another way would be to go into Aspect Oriented Programming and look into concepts such as interception, where basically you intercept certain method calls and perform tasks as a result. Many DI frameworks (I wanna say all?) support interception, so that might be something that you prefer.

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In his article he really factored out one facade that utilizes stuff that is called one by one so it's possible to gather in one facade. But my dependencies do not share the same kind of logic... For instance how do you join logger and timer factory? –  Ilya Chernomordik Aug 13 '13 at 13:55
    
I wouldn't, logger is a cross-cutting concern (IMHO), I'd employ a different strategy. –  Dimitar Dimitrov Aug 13 '13 at 15:23
    
So any suggestions for this different strategy? –  Ilya Chernomordik Aug 14 '13 at 7:25
    
@IlyaChernomordik I've done a little edit, since it's going to be long for the comment section. –  Dimitar Dimitrov Aug 14 '13 at 7:52

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