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I want to be able to make classes which extend the MySQLi class to perform all its SQL queries.

$mysql = new mysqli('localhost', 'root', 'password', 'database') or die('error connecting to the database');

I dont know how to do this without globalising the $mysql object to use in my other methods or classes.

class Blog {

public function comment() {
	global $mysql;

	//rest here
}

}

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks.

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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My suggestion is to create a Singleton DataAccess class, instantiate that class in a global config file and call it in your Blog class like $query = DataAccess::query("SELECT * FROM blog WHERE id = ".$id).

Look into the Singleton pattern, it's a pretty easy to understand designpattern. Perfect for this situation.

Your DataAccess class can have several methods like query, fetchAssoc, numRows, checkUniqueValue, transactionStart, transactionCommit, transactionRollback etc etc. Those function could also be setup as an Interface which gets implemented by the DataAccess class. That way you can easily extend your DataAccess class for multiple database management systems.

The above pretty much describes my DataAccess model.

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If i use singletons, would it create a new connection to the database everytime its called? –  bennn Nov 30 '09 at 15:59
1  
No, thats the idea of Singleton. You create one instance and you keep using that instance by calling it static. So you have 1 db connection for all classes / controllers / views etc. –  Ben Nov 30 '09 at 16:28
    
Ben thanks for your help, this worked perfectly! –  bennn Nov 30 '09 at 17:26
    
You're welcome! –  Ben Nov 30 '09 at 18:52
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I was working on something similar. I'm happy about this singleton class that encapsulates the database login.

<?php
class db extends mysqli
{
    protected static $instance;
    protected static $options = array();

    private function __construct() {
        $o = self::$options;

        // turn of error reporting
        mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_OFF);

        // connect to database
        @parent::__construct(isset($o['host'])   ? $o['host']   : 'localhost',
                             isset($o['user'])   ? $o['user']   : 'root',
                             isset($o['pass'])   ? $o['pass']   : '',
                             isset($o['dbname']) ? $o['dbname'] : 'world',
                             isset($o['port'])   ? $o['port']   : 3306,
                             isset($o['sock'])   ? $o['sock']   : false );

        // check if a connection established
        if( mysqli_connect_errno() ) {
            throw new exception(mysqli_connect_error(), mysqli_connect_errno()); 
        }
    }

    public static function getInstance() {
        if( !self::$instance ) {
            self::$instance = new self(); 
        }
        return self::$instance;
    }

    public static function setOptions( array $opt ) {
        self::$options = array_merge(self::$options, $opt);
    }

    public function query($query) {
        if( !$this->real_query($query) ) {
            throw new exception( $this->error, $this->errno );
        }

        $result = new mysqli_result($this);
        return $result;
    }

    public function prepare($query) {
        $stmt = new mysqli_stmt($this, $query);
        return $stmt;
    }    
}

To use you can have something like this:

<?php
require "db.class.php";

$sql = db::getInstance();

$result = $sql->query("select * from city");

/* Fetch the results of the query */ 
while( $row = $result->fetch_assoc() ){ 
    printf("%s (%s)\n", $row['Name'], $row['Population']); 
} 
?>
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1  
I like this class as an example of Singleton, but would quibble with the need for overriding query() and prepare() since the mysqli OO API already provides those. –  sbeam Jun 28 '12 at 17:15
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My standard method is to make a singleton class that acts as the database accessor, and a base class that everything requiring such access inherits from.

So:

class Base {

  protected $db;

  function __construct(){
    $this->db= MyDBSingleton::get_link();
    //any other "global" vars you might want 
  }

}


class myClass extends Base {

  function __construct($var) {
     parent::__construct();// runs Base constructor
     $this->init($var);
  }

  function init($id) {
    $id=(int) $id;
    $this->db->query("SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE id=$id");
    //etc.
  }
}
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You can use PHP's extends keyword just for any other class:

class Blog extends mysqli {

    public function __construct($host, $user, $password, $database) {
    	parent::__construct($host, $user, $password, $database);
    }

    public function someOtherMethod() {
    }
}

$blog = new Blog('localhost', 'root', 'password', 'database') or die('Cannot connect!');

or better use object aggregation instead of inheritance:

class Blog {

    private $db;

    public function __construct($host, $user, $password, $database) {
    	$this->db	= new mysqli($host, $user, $password, $database);
    }

    public function someOtherMethod() {
    	return $this->db->query("SELECT * FROM blah_balh");
    }
}
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1  
Thats a whacked solution beause in NO way Blog is an extension of the mysqli class. It simply uses it, not extends it with new functionallity provided for data-access. –  Ben Nov 30 '09 at 15:26
    
It is clear Blog's itself cannot be a subclass of database object, I used to answer question, not to judge application design. –  Emre Yazıcı Nov 30 '09 at 15:30
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Have a look at PDO, which throw exceptions for you to catch if a query fails. It's widely used and tested so you shouldn't have a problem finding existing solutions whilst using it.

To inject it into your blog class:

class Blog {

    private $_db;

    public function __construct(PDO $db) {
        $this->_db = $db
    }

    public function comment() {
        return $this->_db->query(/*something*/);
    }

}
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First: @emre-yazici I would have answered the same thing.

The question is:

"I want to be able to make classes which extend the MySQLi class"

followed by:

class Blog {

Personally I don't care what he calls his class: Blog/Blabla, my assumption is that he should create a CLASS in a FILE to deal with his db connection method and include it in whatever file does queries followed by a $db = new db_object() in some db_getConnection function.

DbController.php
<?php
class db_Object extends mysqli {

protected $host = "mysqlHost";
protected $user = "mysqlUsername";
protected $password = "mysqlPassword";
protected $database = "mysqlDatabse";

// constructor
public function db_Object() {
    parent::__construct($this->host, $this->user, $this->password, $this->database);
}
?>

getData.php
<?php
include_once('DbController.php');
class getData {
function getConnection() {
 $db = new db_Object();
 return $db;
}

function get_PostCodes() {
 $db = $this->getConnection();
 $sql = "SELECT * FROM Postcodes":
 $db->query($sql);
}
?>

I think we can all agree to that. In fact most php frameworks out there will already have an object/DbController to handle connections so you'd think it's the way to go.

(*OO means Object Oriented) I think that this question was poorly formulated and thus misleading. It's amazing that bennn is using OO, but couldn't think to put his Db connection in an object of it's own. Sounds like he's using concepts he doesn't quite understand? However he's asking about methodology, so that actually makes the question valid I guess... I already stopped caring about question validity.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! HOWEVER !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

(* My understanding of singleton is an instance that stays in memory that every execution requiring such object would use, without generating a new object. Slight performance boost http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singleton_pattern *)

Anyone who made mention of 'SINGLETON' and 'Data class' in the same sentence IF I COULD DOWN-VOTE YOU I WOULD! SAYING THAT IS DOWNRIGHT EVIL!

The only "Maybe" applicable situation for a SINGLETON db class would be a reporting server, or a simple static website that does SELECTS ONLY. In which case you could use something like NoSQL while you're at it.

FOR ALL OTHER CASES, INCLUDING "I DON'T KNOW WHAT I'M DOING" CASE Create a new dbConnection every time you need to run SQL

EXPLANATION

When you use a Singleton and pass all your SQL statements through that one instance, As soon as you try something like $db->autocommit(false);

and start doing something like BEGIN TRANSACTION [...] UPDATE DELETE ROLLBACK COMMIT in different function calls, those SQL statements may go to the DB in an unorderly fashion. You may end up having another processes run a ROLLBACK when you wanted to run a COMMIT, and none of your changes will take place. You may have a COMMIT happen instead of a ROLLBACK and half your process get applied when you wanted it to cancel out instead. Leaving you with big time Data corruption in your database. I'm sure we could think of a million other types of SINGLETON corruptions that would screw up ALL of the flow of data between your php application and the Database. This is one of the drawbacks of the singleton pattern: "it introduces a global state".

Always creating a new connection (instance of your DbController/db_object/whatever) is not only a better and safer model but it's also future proof. You never know what future improvements will need to be implemented by you or someone else on the php application/website, making the DbController as a singleton is setting bad grounds to line yourself with terrible problems in the future.

PLEASE STOP ADVISING SINGLETON DB OBJECTS. THERE IS ENOUGH BAD CODE OUT THERE ALREADY. KIND REGARDS.

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1  
Always create a new connection - really? I am afraid you never tested your ideas on a whatever live environment. Please do. –  Your Common Sense Aug 20 '13 at 5:10
    
I had problem of running out of mysql connections by always creating a new connection in a website which I developed and later had a good user base. Please don't recommend this to everyone. –  jagmohan Jan 3 at 10:13
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