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I am trying to write a simple program that starts at the number 99 and writes down all the multiples of 99 but under 1000000000 to a text file named: 'Blank.txt' this is my code:

f = open('Blank.txt')
a = 99
while a <= 1000000000:
   f.read()
   a = str(a)
   f.write(a)
   a = int(a)
   a = a * 2

f.close()

One problem.. For some reason i can't write to the text file? Please help me be able to write this the multiples of 99 to this text file. BTW if you have another way to do it using Python please post it!

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I rollbacked your code to the earlier version - please do not change the code in your question. –  Antti Haapala Aug 13 '13 at 9:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to open the file in write('w') mode:

with open('blank.txt', 'w') as f:
   for num in range(99, 1000000001, 99):
       #do something here.

Note that there's no need to close the file now, with statement will do that automatically for you.

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Thank you! This helped! –  NoviceProgrammer Aug 13 '13 at 9:35
    
also one more thing! How do i insert a newline character (/n) after each iteration of a? SO that each value is displayed on a newline? –  NoviceProgrammer Aug 13 '13 at 9:39
    
@user2655778 Use '\n', f.write(str(num) + '\n') –  Ashwini Chaudhary Aug 13 '13 at 9:40
    
or use the print-function - print(num, file=f) –  Antti Haapala Aug 13 '13 at 9:42
    
Thank you @Antti Haapala –  NoviceProgrammer Aug 13 '13 at 9:48

Like the aforementioned answer said, you delcare what you want to write to the file using "w" when you first open the file; however, you could and should add a w+ instead, because then you can read what you've written to the file too- this would be reasonable so you can then check if the results are what you expected. As a result, this saves time, because closing the program and opening it again and then reading from it a takes up more space, so on a larger scale, the code would take longer to read and potentially longer to debug if there were any mistakes So it should be something like this:

                  f = open('Blank.txt', "w+")

                  a = 99

                  while a <= 1000000000:
                  f.read()

                  a = str(a)
                  f.write(a)
                  a = int(a)
                  a = a * 2

                  f.close()

Also, in your initial code, you would have generated an error any way, because when you opened the file, you didn't tell it to read from it which is "r" or "r+" or "w+", so putting f.read() after would invoke an error

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