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I want to write program using multithreading wait and notify methods in Java.
This program has a stack (max-length = 5). Producer generate number forever and put it in the stack, and consumer pick it from stack.

When stack is full producer must wait and when stack is empty consumers must wait.
The problem is that it runs just once, I mean once it produce 5 number it stops but i put run methods in while(true) block to run nonstop able but it doesn't.
Here is what i tried so far.
Producer class:

package trail;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.Stack;

public class Thread1 implements Runnable {
    int result;
    Random rand = new Random();
    Stack<Integer> A = new Stack<>();

    public Thread1(Stack<Integer> A) {
        this.A = A;
    }

    public synchronized void produce()
    {
        while (A.size() >= 5) {
            System.out.println("List is Full");
            try {
                wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        result = rand.nextInt(10);

        System.out.println(result + " produced ");
        A.push(result);
        System.out.println(A);

        this.notify();
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Producer get started");

        try {
            Thread.sleep(10);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        while (true) {
            produce();
            try {
                Thread.sleep(100);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

And the consumer:

package trail;

import java.util.Stack;

public class Thread2 implements Runnable {
    Stack<Integer> A = new Stack<>();

    public Thread2(Stack<Integer> A) {
        this.A = A;
    }

    public synchronized void consume() {
        while (A.isEmpty()) {
            System.err.println("List is empty" + A + A.size());
            try {
                wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        System.err.println(A.pop() + " Consumed " + A);
        this.notify();
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("New consumer get started");
        try {
            Thread.sleep(10);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        while (true) {
            consume();
        }
    }
}

and here is the main method:

public static void main(String[] args) {

        Stack<Integer> stack = new Stack<>();

        Thread1 thread1 = new Thread1(stack);// p
        Thread2 thread2 = new Thread2(stack);// c
        Thread A = new Thread(thread1);
        Thread B = new Thread(thread2);
        Thread C = new Thread(thread2);
        A.start();

        B.start();
        C.start();     
    }
share|improve this question
    
What object are you synchronizing on in the producer? What object are you synchronizing on in the consumer? –  Martin James Aug 13 '13 at 9:41
    
please complete the code and remove empty lines and those with useless comments –  Ralf H Aug 13 '13 at 9:48
    
prodeuce method in Thread1 class and consume method in Thread2 class are synchornized –  Saeed Mirzaee Aug 13 '13 at 9:57

6 Answers 6

I think it will be better for understanding and dealing with synchronisation in general if you try to separate three things which are currently mixed:

  1. Task which is going to do the actual job. Names for classes Thread1 & Thread2 are misleading. They are not Thread objects, but they are actually jobs or tasks implementing Runnable interface you are giving to Thread objects.

  2. Thread object itself which you are creating in main

  3. Shared object which encapsulates synchronised operations/logic on a queue, a stack etc. This object will be shared between tasks. And inside this shared object you will take care of add/remove operations (either with synchronized blocks or synchronized methods). Currently (as it was pointed out already), synchronization is done on a task itself (i.e. each task waits and notifies on its own lock and nothing happens). When you separate concerns, i.e. let one class do one thing properly it will eventually become clear where is the problem.

share|improve this answer

Your consumer and you producer are synchronized on different objects and do not block each other. If this works, I daresay it's accidental.

Read up on java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue and java.util.concurrent.ArrayBlockingQueue. These provide you with more modern and easier way to implement this pattern.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/BlockingQueue.html

share|improve this answer
    
where can i find useful article? –  Saeed Mirzaee Aug 13 '13 at 10:51
    

You should synchronize on the stack instead of putting it at the method level try this code.

Also don't initalize the stack in your thread classes anyways you are passing them in the constructor from the main class , so no need of that.

Always try to avoid mark any method with synchronized keyword instead of that try to put critical section of code in the synchronized block because the more size of your synchronized area more it will impact on performance.

So, always put only that code into synchronized block that need thread safety.

Producer Code :

public void produce()
{
   synchronized (A) {
       while (A.size() >= 5) {
           System.out.println("List is Full");
           try {
               A.wait();
           } catch (InterruptedException e) {
               // TODO Auto-generated catch block
               e.printStackTrace();
           }
       }
       result = rand.nextInt(10);

       System.out.println(result + " produced ");
       A.push(result);
       System.out.println("stack ---"+A);

       A.notifyAll();
}

}

Consumer Code :

    public void consume() {
        synchronized (A) {
        while (A.isEmpty()) {
            System.err.println("List is empty" + A + A.size());
            try {
                System.err.println("wait");
               A.wait();
          //  System.err.println("wait");
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
             System.err.println(A.pop() + " Consumed " + A);
             A.notifyAll();
    }



}
share|improve this answer
    
what does A.notifyAll() really do? –  Saeed Mirzaee Aug 13 '13 at 10:52
    
It will notfiy all the threads that are waiting on a particular event , in our case it will be when producer thread is waiting on stack to be empty and consumer threads waiting on stack to contain some data. - thanks –  saurav Aug 13 '13 at 11:13
    
Why we use a while loop and not if ? Any specific reasons for that ? –  Aman Arora Feb 12 at 19:33

Try this:

import java.util.concurrent.locks.Condition;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.Lock;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantLock;

public class CircularArrayQueue<T> {


private volatile Lock rwLock = new ReentrantLock();
private volatile Condition emptyCond = rwLock.newCondition();
private volatile Condition fullCond = rwLock.newCondition();

private final int size;

private final Object[] buffer;
private volatile int front;
private volatile int rare;

/**
 * @param size
 */
public CircularArrayQueue(int size) {
    this.size = size;
    this.buffer = new Object[size];
    this.front = -1;
    this.rare = -1;

}

public boolean isEmpty(){
    return front == -1;
}

public boolean isFull(){
    return (front == 0 && rare == size-1) || (front == rare + 1);
}

public void enqueue(T item){
    try{
        // get a write lock
        rwLock.lock();
        // if the Q is full, wait the write lock
        if(isFull())
            fullCond.await();

        if(rare == -1){
            rare = 0;
            front = 0;
        } else if(rare == size - 1){
            rare = 0;
        } else {
            rare ++;
        }

        buffer[rare] = item;
        //System.out.println("Added\t: " + item);

        // notify the reader
        emptyCond.signal();
    } catch(InterruptedException e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        // unlock the write lock
        rwLock.unlock();
    }

}

public T dequeue(){
    T item = null;
    try{
        // get the read lock
        rwLock.lock();
        // if the Q is empty, wait the read lock
        if(isEmpty())
            emptyCond.await();



        item = (T)buffer[front];
        //System.out.println("Deleted\t: " + item);
        if(front == rare){
            front = rare = -1;
        } else if(front == size - 1){
            front = 0;
        } else {
            front ++;
        }


        // notify the writer
        fullCond.signal();

    } catch (InterruptedException e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally{
        // unlock read lock
        rwLock.unlock();
    }
    return item;
}
}
share|improve this answer

Seems like you skipped something about wait(), notify() and synchronized. See this example, it should help you.

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You can use Java's awesome java.util.concurrent package and its classes.

You can easily implement the producer consumer problem using the BlockingQueue. A BlockingQueue already supports operations that wait for the queue to become non-empty when retrieving an element, and wait for space to become available in the queue when storing an element.

Without BlockingQueue, every time we put data to queue at the producer side, we need to check if queue is full, and if full, wait for some time, check again and continue. Similarly on the consumer side, we would have to check if queue is empty, and if empty, wait for some time, check again and continue. However with BlockingQueue we don’t have to write any extra logic than to just add data from Producer and poll data from Consumer.

Read more From:

http://javawithswaranga.blogspot.in/2012/05/solving-producer-consumer-problem-in.html

http://www.javajee.com/producer-consumer-problem-in-java-using-blockingqueue

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