Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I heard that ORs are bad, and having multiple ORs may significantly affect the performance. But what about row-independent ORs? Take a look at the example:

SELECT
  *
FROM
  some_table t
WHERE
  (
    some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of selecting by id'
    AND t.id = TO_NUMBER(another_function('ID'))
  )
  OR (
    some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of filtering by name'
    AND t.name LIKE '%' || another_function('NAME') || '%'
  )
  OR (
    some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of taking actual rows'
    AND TO_DATE(another_function('ACTUAL_DATE'), '...')
        BETWEEN t.start_date AND t.end_date
  )
  ...

Here some_function('CONTEXT') returns same value regardless of row (it doesn't use any row-dependent data such as column values as its arguments and it doesn't change its internal state affecting the result when query is executing). It also can be just a package variable like some_package.context.
As I think, optimizer should compute some_function('CONTEXT') first and then decide which one OR to take.
But what will happen actually? How can I be sure that there will no performance leaks with such a query?

P.S.: 11.2

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You'll need to use the undocumented hint use_concat(or_predicates(1)) or re-write the query using UNION ALL. The optimizer has problems with these types of predicates, regardless of the function.

Expected Plan

You want a plan that looks something like this:

------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                     | Name         |
------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT              |              |
|   1 |  CONCATENATION                |              |
|*  2 |   FILTER                      |              |
|*  3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL          | SOME_TABLE   |
|*  4 |   FILTER                      |              |
|*  5 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL          | SOME_TABLE   |
|*  6 |   FILTER                      |              |
|*  7 |    TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| SOME_TABLE   |
|*  8 |     INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | SYS_C0010268 |
------------------------------------------------------

The FILTER in the Operation is very different than the typical filter in the Predicate Information section of the explain plan. These FILTERs will evaluate a condition and decide which part of the execution plan to use at runtime. Depending on the values passed to the function the plan will either use a full table scan (for an unselective pridicate on names or dates) or use a unique index scan (for a very selective predicate on the id).

This is exactly what you want with a query like yours. And if the query only had a small number of ANDs and ORs, there would likely be a FILTER.

Actual Plan

But in reality, with a complex predicate, the plan looks like this:

----------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation         | Name       |
----------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT  |            |
|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL| SOME_TABLE |
----------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   1 - filter("SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of filtering by name' 
              AND "T"."NAME" LIKE '%'||"ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('NAME')||'%' OR 
              "SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of taking actual rows' AND 
              "T"."START_DATE"<=TO_DATE("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ACTUAL_DATE'),'...') AND 
              "T"."END_DATE">=TO_DATE("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ACTUAL_DATE'),'...') OR 
              "SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of selecting by id' AND 
              "T"."ID"=TO_NUMBER("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ID')))

Full table scans aren't always bad. But they're pretty awful for selecting a single primary key value.

Sample Schema

Create a table and 1 million sample rows. Some columns are highly selective and some are very unselective. They all have histograms, so the optimizer has a lot of good information to work with.

drop table some_table purge;

create table some_table
(
    id          number primary key,
    name        varchar2(100),
    start_date  date,
    end_date    date
);

begin
    for i in 1 .. 10 loop
        insert into some_table
        select 
            level+(i*100000),
            'Name '||mod(level, 5),
            date '2000-01-01' + mod(level, 10000),
            date '2010-01-01' + mod(level, 10000)
        from dual
        connect by level <= 100000;
    end loop;
end;
/
begin
    dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user, 'SOME_TABLE'
        ,method_opt => 'for all columns size 254');
end;
/

Sample Functions

These functions are very static and the optimizer should know that. This example uses some_function in a way that will never match anything. This is a sort of best case scenario; it should be very easy for Oracle to figure out that this query will return nothing.

--Static functions.
create or replace function some_function(p_context in varchar2) return varchar2 is
begin
    return p_context;
end;
/
--Btw, returning stringly-typed data is almost always a horrible idea.
--(Althogh if you're dealing with sys_context you may not have a choice.)
create or replace function another_function(p_type in varchar2) return varchar2 is
begin
    if p_type = 'ID' then
        return '1';
    elsif p_type = 'NAME' then
        return 'Name 1';
    elsif p_type = 'ACTUAL_DATE' then
        return '2000-01-01';
    end if;
end;
/

Deafault - bad plan with no FILTER operations

The default plan is very poor. The query should run in almost 0 seconds, but instead must do a full table scan.

explain plan for
SELECT * FROM some_table t
WHERE
  (
    some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of selecting by id'
    AND t.id = TO_NUMBER(another_function('ID'))
  )
  OR (
    some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of filtering by name'
    AND t.name LIKE '%' || another_function('NAME') || '%'
  )
  OR (
    some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of taking actual rows'
    AND TO_DATE(another_function('ACTUAL_DATE'), '...')
        BETWEEN t.start_date AND t.end_date
  );

select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);

Plan hash value: 3038250352

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation         | Name       | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT  |            |   525 | 14700 |  1504  (17)| 00:00:01 |
|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL| SOME_TABLE |   525 | 14700 |  1504  (17)| 00:00:01 |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   1 - filter("SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of filtering by name' 
              AND "T"."NAME" LIKE '%'||"ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('NAME')||'%' OR 
              "SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of taking actual rows' AND 
              "T"."START_DATE"<=TO_DATE("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ACTUAL_DATE'),'...') AND 
              "T"."END_DATE">=TO_DATE("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ACTUAL_DATE'),'...') OR 
              "SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of selecting by id' AND 
              "T"."ID"=TO_NUMBER("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ID')))

use_concat(or_predicates(1)) - Good plan with FILTERs

The USE_CONCAT hint will transform the query into separate UNION ALL steps. And then each predicate is simple and has a FILTER operation. Unfortuantely USE_CONCAT has some weird limitations. Sometimes it will only work if indexes are used (see My Oracle Support document 259741.1). And sometimes it just doesn't work at all, the work-around doesn't work, and it's still not fixed in 12c (document 14545269.8).

Adding or_predicates(1) makes it work, but it's completely undocumented.

explain plan for
SELECT --+ use_concat(or_predicates(1))
  *
FROM some_table t
WHERE
  (
    some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of selecting by id'
    AND t.id = TO_NUMBER(another_function('ID'))
  )
  OR (
    some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of filtering by name'
    AND t.name LIKE '%' || another_function('NAME') || '%'
  )
  OR (
    some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of taking actual rows'
    AND TO_DATE(another_function('ACTUAL_DATE'), '...')
        BETWEEN t.start_date AND t.end_date
  );

select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);

Plan hash value: 1618041905

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                     | Name         | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT              |              | 52500 |  1435K|  2721   (8)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  CONCATENATION                |              |       |       |            |          |
|*  2 |   FILTER                      |              |       |       |            |          |
|*  3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL          | SOME_TABLE   |  2500 | 70000 |  1362   (8)| 00:00:01 |
|*  4 |   FILTER                      |              |       |       |            |          |
|*  5 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL          | SOME_TABLE   | 49999 |  1367K|  1356   (7)| 00:00:01 |
|*  6 |   FILTER                      |              |       |       |            |          |
|*  7 |    TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| SOME_TABLE   |     1 |    28 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  8 |     INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | SYS_C0010269 |     1 |       |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   2 - filter("SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of taking actual rows')
   3 - filter("T"."START_DATE"<=TO_DATE("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ACTUAL_DATE'),'...') AND 
              "T"."END_DATE">=TO_DATE("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ACTUAL_DATE'),'...'))
   4 - filter("SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of filtering by name')
   5 - filter("T"."NAME" LIKE '%'||"ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('NAME')||'%' AND 
              (LNNVL("SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of taking actual rows') OR 
              LNNVL("T"."START_DATE"<=TO_DATE("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ACTUAL_DATE'),'...')) OR 
              LNNVL("T"."END_DATE">=TO_DATE("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ACTUAL_DATE'),'...'))))
   6 - filter("SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of selecting by id')
   7 - filter((LNNVL("SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of filtering by name') OR 
              LNNVL("T"."NAME" LIKE '%'||"ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('NAME')||'%')) AND 
              (LNNVL("SOME_FUNCTION"('CONTEXT')='context of taking actual rows') OR 
              LNNVL("T"."START_DATE"<=TO_DATE("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ACTUAL_DATE'),'...')) OR 
              LNNVL("T"."END_DATE">=TO_DATE("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ACTUAL_DATE'),'...'))))
   8 - access("T"."ID"=TO_NUMBER("ANOTHER_FUNCTION"('ID')))

UNION ALL - Good plan with FILTERs

Expanding the query manually is probably a safer approach. But it may get very ugly depending on how complicated your query is.

explain plan for
SELECT * FROM some_table t
WHERE some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of selecting by id' AND t.id = TO_NUMBER(another_function('ID'))
union all
SELECT * FROM some_table t
WHERE some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of filtering by name' AND t.name LIKE '%' || another_function('NAME') || '%'
union all
SELECT * FROM some_table t
WHERE some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of taking actual rows' AND TO_DATE(another_function('ACTUAL_DATE'), '...') BETWEEN t.start_date AND t.end_date

select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);

(Plan not shown - it's basically the same as the `USE_CONCAT` version.)

CASE - Bad plan with no FILTERs

Re-writing the predicates into a single CASE was a good idea, but does not appear to work here. Although that may only be a problem with my specific example.

explain plan for
SELECT *
FROM some_table t
WHERE
    case
    when some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of selecting by id'
        AND t.id = TO_NUMBER(another_function('ID')) then 1
    when some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of filtering by name'
        AND t.name LIKE '%' || another_function('NAME') || '%' then 1
    when some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of taking actual rows'
        AND TO_DATE(another_function('ACTUAL_DATE'), '...') BETWEEN t.start_date AND t.end_date then 1
    else 0 end
    = 1;

select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);

(Plan not shown - it's basically the same as the default version with the full table scan.)
share|improve this answer
1  
In your demo functions you created are marked as DETERMINISTIC. This tells to Oracle, that the function will always return the same result for the same arguments. When a function is deterministic, Oracle can store it's results in the cache, and for the same argument will take the results from the cache and won't execute the function code. But my understandig of the question is that these function CAN, and even SHOULD change their results depending on some context variables, and therfore cannot be deteministic, because in case the context will change, Oracle will still take old values fr cache. –  kordirko Aug 23 '13 at 10:06
    
@kordirko Thank you, you're right, it probably doesn't make sense to use DETERMINISTIC. I assumed that 'CONTEXT' was just a placeholder for an actual sys_context(...) variable. But since the question also mentions package variables that's probably not correct. But the results are the same regardless of DETERMINISTIC. I updated the answer. –  Jon Heller Aug 23 '13 at 12:52

You're right - that's what the optimizer should do. In my experience though, that's not what it does.

Strangely, you can still get the behavior you want for this case though - if you convert your predicates to a case statement like thus:

case
    when some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of selecting by id'
    AND t.id = TO_NUMBER(another_function('ID')
    then 1 -- satisfied

    when some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of filtering by name'
    AND t.name LIKE '%' || another_function('NAME') || '%'
    then 1 -- satisfied

    when some_function('CONTEXT') = 'context of taking actual rows'
    AND TO_DATE(another_function('ACTUAL_DATE'), '...')
        BETWEEN t.start_date AND t.end_date
    then 1 -- satisfied

    ...

    else 0 -- unsatisfied

end = 1  -- rows from candidate set are only in the result set when
         -- they are "satisfied"

Then Oracle will normally resolve this as a filter operation instead of a union, which will prevent the "usual" performance problems that people often run into by using logical ORs.

As a bonus, this method often works with non-row-static context for "some_function(...)" as well!

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with you that the optimizer should figure this out, but does not. But I don't think your CASE statement will solve this issue. CASE will enable short-circuit logic, which may be beneficial here. But it does not appear to enable a FILTER operation, see my answer. (If you can modify my answer to make the CASE work, please do.) –  Jon Heller Aug 23 '13 at 12:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.