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Let say I have a class called CIRCLE, and another called SQUARE. In each of those class, I have a public function called area. (to calculate the area of the circle, and the area of the square respectively.)

I have also a class iMath. and in this class, I have a function ADD

    Public Function ADD(byval c as CIRCLE, byval s as SQUARE) 
       Return c.area() + s.area()
    End Function 

Now I want to Unit test the ADD function. Obviously, for this very easy problem, I can easily create a circle object and a square object to Unit test my ADD function. However, let assume that my Circle object and Square object are very complicated objects, very hard to create a object, because they inherit and contains many other dependencies. In such case,

  1. How can I fake the CIRCLE and SQUARE objects ? (note: the CIRCLE and SQUARE classes don't have Public Sub New without any parameter in it)

  2. How can I fake the results of the area functions the CIRCLE and SQUARE objects (I just need a number to test my ADD function, and I don't care how the areas are calculated)

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you make all of the members of the CIRCLE and SQUARE classes Overridable, then you can inherit them and override all the members with stubs, for instance:

Public Class Circle
    Public Overridable Function Area() As Integer
        ' Complicated logic
    End Function
End Class

Public Class MockCircle
    Inherits Circle

    Public Overrides Function Area() As Integer
        Return 10
    End Function
End Class

However, if the original CIRCLE class requires a bunch of difficult-to-create parameters in its constructor, then that doesn't help you any because the MockCircle class will still be required to call the base constructor.

The preferable solution is to use interfaces. Instead of having your ADD method accept a concrete CIRCLE object, have it ask for an object that implements an ICircle interface instead:

Public Interface ICircle
    Function Area() As Integer
End Interface

Public Class Circle
    Implements ICircle

    Public Function Area() As Integer Implements ICircle.Area
        ' Complicated logic
    End Function
End Class

Public Class MockCircle
    Implements ICircle

    Public Function Area() As Integer Implements ICircle.Area
        Return 10
    End Function
End Class

Public Class MyMath
    Public Function Add(c As ICircle, s As ISquare) As Integer
        Return c.Area() + s.Area()
    End Function
End Class

Now, it doesn't matter what the CIRCLE requires in its constructor because you have taken it entirely out of the equation. Now, you can give the ADD method either a CIRCLE object or a MockCircle object and it will work either way. The MockCircle object doesn't inherit from CIRCLE, so it doesn't share any of its complicated dependencies. This methodology actually has a convenient name too. It's called Dependency Injection (DI). If you are going to be doing a lot of unit testing, it would be well worth your time to do some research on DI. Ideally, the dependencies for the CIRCLE class would also all be done via interfaces as well, so then you could easily create even a CIRCLE object by giving it all mock objects for its dependencies as well.

I feel obligated to mention some surface issues with your code too. For consistency with the .NET framework and Microsoft standards, you should use PascalCase for all of your method and class names. So for instance, it should be Add rather than ADD, and it should be Circle and Square rather than CIRCLE and SQUARE. Also, the iMath class name should not start with the letter "i". Putting an "I" at the beginning of a type name, according to Microsoft standards, means that it is an interface, not a class. The last issue I see is that your ADD function does not specify a return type. You should always specify the return type for all functions. For instance, in my example, I changed it to return As Integer.

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1  
thank you Steven for your advice on the coding style. It is very useful. Regarding to the TDD, if I want to Unit test all functions in a class, says, MyMath Class, from your advice, are you implying that I would have to make the interface for all functions I have? – N.T.C Aug 15 '13 at 9:10
1  
Yes, when you are unit testing, it is MUCH easier if all public methods are exposed and used via at least one interface. If you don't do that, it will be far more difficult to implement mock objects for testing. Besides all the advantages for unit testing, DI, via interfaces, has many other advantages too. For instance it makes your code more flexible, cleaner, more expandable, less buggy, easier to maintain and refactor, etc. If you'd like some more examples and introduction on the subject, you could read through some of my other, more in depth answers on the topic. – Steven Doggart Aug 15 '13 at 12:15
1  
There's no magic bullet with unit testing. If you want to unit test your code, you have to write testable code. There are products out there that offer the ability to mock any class, even when it doesn't implement an interface, but there's no replacement for good testable code. If you must, you could write wrapper classes for your teammate's classes. For instance, you could make an ICircle interface and a MyCircle class which implements it, and then inside the MyCircle class, have it just pass through all the logic to the original CIRCLE class. – Steven Doggart Aug 16 '13 at 11:42
1  
Essentially, yes. At least all business logic classes should have interfaces. Sometimes it makes sense to have multiple classes share the same interface, because they are all the same, but unless making them interchangeable is the purpose of the interface, don't feel obligated to reuse interfaces. If none of the business classes are meant the be interchangeable, it's not at all unreasonable to have a separate interface defined for each one. – Steven Doggart Aug 18 '13 at 16:45
1  
It's admittedly much easier to do when you are writing a new project from scratch. When you are working in existing legacy code, sometimes you can only do things partially right :) But even if you only do things right where you can or where you really need to, you're still better off than doing it all wrong. – Steven Doggart Aug 18 '13 at 16:45

You should rely on existing mocking framework, which exactly solves that problem. One of my favourite one is NSubsitute.

It could create mock for any any interface of class with virtual functions. And in general it's more preferable that creating of manual mocks.

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