Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I run this code:

var cancellation = new CancellationTokenSource();
var cancelledTask1 = .....;//starting new long-running task that accepts cancellation.Token
var cancelledTask2 = .....;//starting new long-running task that accepts cancellation.Token

//then I request cancellation
cancellation.Cancel();
//some task gets cancelled before code below executes
try
{
    //wait for completion (some task is already in cancelled state)
    await Task.WhenAll(cancelledTask1, cancelledTask2);
}
catch (OperationCanceledException e)
{
    Logger.Debug("await WhenAll", e);
}

And I get

await WhenAll System.Threading.Tasks.TaskCanceledException: A task was canceled.

I assume that it trows because some task is already in cancelled state. Why does Task.WhenAll method breaks normal flow and throws the exception in case of cancelled child tasks? Whant is benefit from this behavior?

Then, I try the method Task.WhenAny:

var cancellation = new CancellationTokenSource();
var cancelledTask3 = .....;//starting new long-running task that accepts cancellation.Token

//then I request cancellation
cancellation.Cancel();
//the task gets cancelled before code below executes
try
{
    //wait for completion (the task is already in cancelled state)
    await Task.WhenAny(cancelledTask3);
}
catch (OperationCanceledException e)
{
    Logger.Debug("await WhenAny", e);
}

and it doesnt throw exceptions.

The second question is why Task.WhenAny does not throw exceptions in the same case? I expect that both methods should handle cancelled tasks the same way: either throw exceptions or not.

share|improve this question
    
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh194914.aspx The returned task will complete when any of the supplied tasks has completed. The returned task will always end in the RanToCompletion state with its Result set to the first task to complete. This is true even if the first task to complete ended in the Canceled or Faulted state. – ta.speot.is Aug 13 '13 at 12:00
    
Right, this is an answer for the first question. AKA "this is by diesign". Below is also interesting opinion about the second question by Doron Yaacoby. – neleus Aug 19 '13 at 20:25
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Task.WhenAny is designed to complete whenever one of the tasks completes, where completion includes failure. I actually find it most useful when one of the tasks might fail. For instance:

try
{
   await Task.WhenAny(task1,task2);
   cancellationToken.Cancel(); //cancel all tasks
   await Task.WhenAll(task1,task2); //wait for both tasks to respect the cancellation
}
catch (Exception x)
{
...
}

Here I only need one of the tasks to complete (hence, the WhenAny). In which case I would like to cancel the other tasks as well. Then I call WhenAll to wait for the other task to respect the cancellation request, and also propagate an exception if it occurred.

In other words, Task.WhenAny is designed to let you do something while other tasks are still running, and it is useful for it not to throw exceptions in order to let you do whatever you want with the other tasks. Task.WhenAll only completes when all the tasks complete (either successfully or not). It can throw the exception because there is nothing left for you to handle, the computation is complete.

share|improve this answer
    
In your example you will always (at least in 99% cases) get exception from Task.WhenAll, right? I guess this will happen because one of the tasks gets cancelled during Task.WhenAll. – neleus Aug 19 '13 at 20:35
    
Right. It will either be an actual exception from one of the tasks, or an OperationCancelledException, because one of the tasks completed and we cancelled the other one. – Doron Yaacoby Aug 20 '13 at 6:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.