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I'm new to using interfaces so I have a question that will probably be pretty easy for most of you.

I am currently trying to make an interface for a windows form. It looks something like

interface myInterface
{
    //stuff stuff stuff
}

public partial class myClass : Form, myInterface
{
   //More stuff stuff stuff. This is the form
}

The problem comes when I try to implement it. If I implement with

myInterface blah = new myClass();
blah.ShowDialog();

the ShowDialog() function is now available to it. It makes sense- myInterface is an interface, not a form... but I'm curious how I should go about implementing the interface with a windows form, or if it is even a viable option at all.

Does anyone have any suggestions about how I should go about doing that?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
I dont understand what you want to do.. please clarify – lordkain Aug 13 '13 at 12:43
4  
As a side note, convention dictate that your interface should start with a capital I and be pascal-cased (ie IMyInterface). Objects should be pascal cased as well (MyClass). Take this with a grain of salt (it is, after all, a convention) but it's good to adhere to widely used practices, even coding convention. – Simon Belanger Aug 13 '13 at 12:47
2  
There's just no point in declaring blah as the interface type. Just declare it myClass and solve your problem. It is only useful when you want to pass your form object to code that doesn't know anything about the myClass type. – Hans Passant Aug 13 '13 at 12:58
1  
@SimonBelanger object != class class case should be cased as you describe (I'm guessing that's what you meant). Objects don't have identity but not names – Rune FS Aug 13 '13 at 12:58
1  
Correct (incorrect usage) - just set the accessors correctly, use internal for methods you want to be public only for your application – Sayse Aug 13 '13 at 13:02
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This appears to be a question about how to correctly expose members of a class.

internal - Access to a method/class is restricted to the application
public - Access is not restricted
private - Access is restricted to the current class (methods)
protected - Access is restricted to the current class and its inherited classes

An example use of an interface is to share common method signatures between classes

interface IAnimal
{
    int FeetCount();
}
public class Dog : IAnimal
{
    int FeetCount()
    {
    }
}

public class Duck : IAnimal
{
    int FeetCount()
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer

One way to approach this would be to add ShowDialog to myInterface:

 interface myInterface
 {
     DialogResult ShowDialog();
 }

Now, you can call that method on the interface without having to cast.

If you want to get a little more fancy with it, you could create another interface which represents any dialog...

interface IDialog
{
     DialogResult ShowDialog();
}

Then make your other interface implement IDialog:

interface myInterface : IDialog
{
     //stuff stuff stuff
}

This has the advantage of potentially reusing more code... You can have methods which accept an argument of type IDialog and they don't have to know about myInterface. If you implement a common base interface for all of your dialogs, you can treat the the same way:

void DialogHelperMethod(IDialog dialog)
{
     dialog.ShowDialog();
}

myInterface foo = new myClass();
DialogHelperMethod(foo);
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work smoothly because ShowDialog() is implemented in Form and not in MyClass. – ja72 Aug 13 '13 at 13:15
    
@ja72 - it should work fine. Your class inherits from Form, which implements ShowDialog – RQDQ Aug 13 '13 at 17:34
interface MyInterface
{
    void Foo();
}

public partial class MyClass : Form, MyInterface
{
   //More stuff stuff stuff. This is the form
}

Form f = new MyClass();
f.ShowDialog(); // Works because MyClass implements Form
f.Foo(); // Works because MyClass implements MyInterface
share|improve this answer

You can only access the items exposed by the type you use to hold myClass. For example,

Form f = new MyClass();
f.ShowDialog();  // Will work because f is of type Form, which has a ShowDialog method
f.stuff(); // Works because MyClass implements myInterface which exposes stuff()

All the things you want are in there, but you have to reference them differently than you're trying to.

share|improve this answer
1  
You shouldn't need to cast if a class implements a method in an interface – Sayse Aug 13 '13 at 12:47
    
But in his sample code, he is using myInterface blah = new myClass(); and then trying to access members of the class, not the Interface. My example was meant to help illustrate that if he wants to call members of Form he can't declare it the way he is. – dazedandconfused Aug 13 '13 at 12:52
    
Even if explicitly implemented cast not required myInterface mi = f; is enough – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 13 '13 at 12:57
    
@Mgetz the cast is not required even if the interface is implemented explicitly. the assignment to a variable with the compile time type of said interface will do the trick – Rune FS Aug 13 '13 at 13:00
    
I removed the cast from this answer which does not deserve -2 – banging Aug 13 '13 at 13:28

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