Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider this code:

if (results.Contains(14))
{
    //anything
}
else if (results.Contains(15))
{
    //anything
}
else if (results.Contains(16))
{
    //anything
}

I want write this code with switch case :

switch (results)
{
    case results.Contains(14):
}

But we can't write this in C#.

What is the clear way for write the above code, knowing that results is a long[]?

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by Henk Holterman, kol, Bridge, devnull, Steve Barnes Aug 13 '13 at 14:47

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What is the type of "results"? Is it derived from ICollection<int>, like List<int>? –  kol Aug 13 '13 at 13:02
    
result is Long[] –  Test Aug 13 '13 at 13:02
    
switch statement requires a constant value. –  pylover Aug 13 '13 at 13:03
    
@pylover yes i dont want just use switch.my question is clear way to write –  Test Aug 13 '13 at 13:04
    
@ShahroozJefriㇱ: Are you always display the same exception?? –  huMpty duMpty Aug 13 '13 at 13:06
show 3 more comments

10 Answers 10

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use a switch statement inside a foreach:

long[] results = new long[] { 15, 14, 16 };
foreach (long v in results)
{
    switch (v)
    {
        case 14:
            // anything
            break;
        case 15:
            // anything
            break;
        case 16:
            // anything
            break;
    }
}

And to better match with your question, you should order the array first and get out the foreach after a match:

long[] results = new long[] { 15, 14, 16 };
Array.Sort(results);
foreach (long v in results)
{
    switch (v)
    {
        case 14:
            // anything
            break;
        case 15:
            // anything
            break;
        case 16:
            // anything
            break;
        default:
            continue; // continue the foreach loop
    }
    break; // break the foreach loop because we had a valid match
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Dictionaries are better solution: stackoverflow.com/a/11617459/1714342 –  wudzik Aug 13 '13 at 13:15
    
@wudzik: I think my answer better matches the (updated) question. The latter example in my answer is a drop in replacement for what the OP wants. –  Wouter Huysentruit Aug 13 '13 at 13:26
    
I like your answer, but it does not have to be a lambda expression. It could simply be: foreach (long v in array) { switch (v) { case 14: break; case 15: break; case 16: break; } } –  Kai Hartmann Aug 13 '13 at 13:39
    
@KaiHartmann you're right, it was overkill, removed it. Thanks. –  Wouter Huysentruit Aug 13 '13 at 13:46
add comment

What's wrong with this:

if (results.Contains(14) || results.Contains(15) || results.Contains(16))
{
  new Exception("anything");
}
share|improve this answer
    
i update my question –  Test Aug 13 '13 at 13:06
    
Ah, I see the question was updated to throw an exception with the value that you're checking in the contains, which makes this answer not relevant anymore... –  ganders Aug 13 '13 at 13:06
    
Please update your answer –  Test Aug 13 '13 at 13:11
add comment

since it is probably in a string that has that number one solution would be to use a regular expression.

var m = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Matches(results, @"\d{1,2}")[0];
throw new Exception(m);

(NOTE: I did this in notepad so it might require a small tweak)

You will have to probably play with the match syntax as this is only good for 1-2 numbers. in a string.

share|improve this answer
add comment

What are you really trying to do?

The following should work, but I am not sure if that's what you had in mind:

int[] values = {14, 15, 16};
foreach (var n in values) {
  if(result.Contains(n)) 
     throw new Exception(n.ToString()) 
}

-- EDIT: the question has changed considerably so here's an update --

I would probably use plain if-else but if you have many options or complex logic (e.g. not just results.Contains()), sometimes it is better to choose tables:

int[] results = {13, 14, 15};
action_map = new Dictionary<int, Action>();
action_map[14] = () => Console.Out.WriteLine("14");
action_map[15] = () => Console.Out.WriteLine("15");
action_map[16] = () => { throw new InvalidOperationException(); };
action_map[0] = () => {}; // NOP, default case - executed if no match found

var action_key = dict.Keys.FirstOrDefault(k => results.Contains(k));
action_map[action_key]();

In real code, I would probably wrap it into a class:

var table = new FnTable();
table.Add(14, () => Console.Out.WriteLine("14"));
table.Add(15, () => Console.Out.WriteLine("15"));
table.Add(16, () => { throw new InvalidOperationException(); });

int[] results = {13, 14, 15};
table.ExecuteFirstFrom(results);
share|improve this answer
    
I think you can remove the part 'if(result.Contains(n))', and use 'result' instead of 'values'. –  Kai Hartmann Aug 13 '13 at 13:42
    
Does not longer fit for the updated question –  Wouter Huysentruit Aug 13 '13 at 13:51
    
oh, thanks for the notification, I will fix it –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Aug 13 '13 at 14:00
    
@KaiHartmann that would affect the order of checks. they have to be done in order defined in values not results. if results is {16, 15, 14} then it wouldn't be the same –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Aug 13 '13 at 15:28
    
Ah ok, my fault. :) –  Kai Hartmann Aug 13 '13 at 15:30
add comment

Usually a clear way to replace if/switch statements is to use polymorphism. However, in the example you've provided the if statements are so trivial, that they can be replaced by a simple algorithm which calculates the contents of the exception, as stated in Robert Snyder's answer.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I like approach with action dictionaries

        var swticher = new Dictionary<long, Func<Exception>>()
        {
            {15,()=>new Exception("15")},
            {14,()=>new Exception("14")}
        };

        throw swticher[14].Invoke();

Of course more complex examples will show power of this approach :)

Why to use dictionaries instead of switches: http://stackoverflow.com/a/11617459/1714342

Abstract:

The short answer is that the switch statement executes linearly, while the dictionary executes logarithmically.

share|improve this answer
    
Answer incomplete –  Wouter Huysentruit Aug 13 '13 at 13:23
    
Your quote is incorrect. switch, in C#, can actually be implemented as a dictionary. That's why all case statements must be compile time constants, rather than any executable expression. Read the complete analysis of your own link for the details. –  Servy Aug 13 '13 at 14:16
add comment

this can give more readability

    bool hasFourteen = results.Any(14)
    bool hasFifteen = results.Any(15)
    bool hasSixteen = results.Any(16)

    if (hasFourteen) do14();
    if (hasFifteen) do15();
    if (hasSixteen) do16();
share|improve this answer
add comment

switch (C# Reference):

Each case label specifies a constant value.

In your expected sample code, results.Contains(14) is not a constant value, so the syntax will not be valid.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I would not actually recommend to do it this way, but if you're really into switch statements...

long? CheckSpecialNumbers(long[] res)
{
    var specialNumbers = new List<long>() {14, 15, 16};
    var inters= specialNumbers.Intersect(res);
    return inters.Count() > 0 ? (long?)inters.First() : null;
}

then you could do:

long? res = CheckSpecialNumbers(results);

switch (res)
{
    case 14:
        Console.WriteLine(14);
        break;
    case 15:
        Console.WriteLine(15);
        break;
    case 16:
        Console.WriteLine(16);
        break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@WouterHuysentruit thanks! –  Paolo Falabella Aug 13 '13 at 13:37
add comment

I want write this code with switch case

A switch-case statement is used to branch the execution path according to the value of a given variable. The OP wants to branch according to the value of a Boolean expression, specifically, the return value of Contains. This can only be done using an if-else statement. Writing switch (results) doesn't make sense, since results is an array of integers.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.