Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am struggling with such task: I need to discretize values in a column from data frame, with bins definition based on value in other column.

For a minimal working example, lets define a simple dataframe:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({'A' : ['one', 'one', 'two', 'three'] * 3,'B' : np.random.randn(12)})

The dataframe looks like this:

        A       B
0       one     2.5772143847077427
1       one     -0.6394141654096013
2       two     0.964652049995486
3       three   -0.3922889559403503
4       one     1.6903991754896424
5       one     0.5741442025742018
6       two     0.6300564981683544
7       three   0.9403680915507433
8       one     0.7044433078166983
9       one     -0.1695006646595688
10      two     0.06376190217285167
11      three   0.277540580579127

Now I would like to introduce column C, which will contain a bin label, with different bins for each of values in column A, i.e.:

  • (-10,-1,0,1,10) for A == 'one',
  • (-100,0,100) for A == 'two',
  • (-999,0,1,2,3) for A == 'three'.

A desired output is:

        A       B       C
0       one     2.5772143847077427      (1, 10]
1       one     -0.6394141654096013     (-1, 0]
2       two     0.964652049995486       (0, 100]
3       three   -0.3922889559403503     (-999, 0]
4       one     1.6903991754896424      (1, 10]
5       one     0.5741442025742018      (0, 1]
6       two     0.6300564981683544      (0, 100]
7       three   0.9403680915507433      (0, 1]
8       one     0.7044433078166983      (0, 1]
9       one     -0.1695006646595688     (-1, 0]
10      two     0.06376190217285167     (0, 100]
11      three   0.277540580579127       (0, 1]

I have tried using pd.cut or np.digitize with different combinations of map, apply, but without success.

Currently I am achieving the result by splitting the frame and applying pd.cut to each subset separately, and then merging to get the frame back, like this:

values_in_column_A = df['A'].unique().tolist()
bins = {'one':(-10,-1,0,1,10),'two':(-100,0,100),'three':(-999,0,1,2,3)}

def binnize(df):

    subdf = []
    for i in range(len(values_in_column_A)):
        subdf.append(df[df['A'] == values_in_column_A[i]])
        subdf[i]['C'] = pd.cut(subdf[i]['B'],bins[values_in_column_A[i]])

    return pd.concat(subdf)

This works, but I do not think it is elegant enough, I also anticipate some speed or memory problems in production, when I will have frames with millions of rows. Speaking straight, I guess this could be done better.

I wolud appreciate any help or ideas...

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Does this solves your problem?

df = pd.DataFrame({'A' : ['one', 'one', 'two', 'three'] * 3,
                   'B' : np.random.randn(12)})
bins = {'one': (-10,-1,0,1,10), 'two':(-100,0,100), 'three':(-999,0,1,2,3)}

def func(row):
    return pd.cut([row['B']], bins=bins[row['A']])[0]

df['C'] = df.apply(func, axis=1)

This returns a DataFrame:

        A         B          C
0     one  1.440957    (1, 10]
1     one  0.394580     (0, 1]
2     two -0.039619  (-100, 0]
3   three -0.500325  (-999, 0]
4     one  0.497256     (0, 1]
5     one  0.342222     (0, 1]
6     two -0.968390  (-100, 0]
7   three -0.772321  (-999, 0]
8     one  0.803178     (0, 1]
9     one  0.201513     (0, 1]
10    two  1.178546   (0, 100]
11  three -0.149662  (-999, 0]

Faster version of binnize:

def binize2(df):
    df['C'] = ''
    for key, values in bins.items():
        mask = df['A'] == key
        df.loc[mask, 'C'] = pd.cut(df.loc[mask, 'B'], bins=values)

%%timeit
df3 = binnize(df1)
10 loops, best of 3: 56.2 ms per loop

%%timeit
binize2(df2)
100 loops, best of 3: 6.64 ms per loop

This is probably due to the fact that it changes the DataFrame inplace and doesn't create a new one.

share|improve this answer
    
It works, but is painfully slow (over 50 times slower)... For DataFrame with 12k rows: timeit df['C'] = df.apply(func, axis=1), result: 1 loops, best of 3: 4.75 s per loop To compare: timeit df2 = binnize(df), result 10 loops, best of 3: 95.6 ms per loop... –  gorkypl Aug 13 '13 at 14:02
    
I guess it may come from the fact that pd.cut is optimized to work on columns, not on single rows... –  gorkypl Aug 13 '13 at 14:10
    
Your right, it seems that the boolean indexing and column wise calculation, works much much faster than the row wise operations... –  Viktor Kerkez Aug 13 '13 at 14:24
1  
Found a 10x faster version of binnize, will add it to the answer. :) –  Viktor Kerkez Aug 13 '13 at 14:30
    
Yay!!! On a larger dataset it is even close to 20 times faster :) –  gorkypl Aug 13 '13 at 15:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.