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I have build a small program that creates a classifier for a given dataset with scikit-learn. Now I wanted to try this example, to see the classifier at work. For example the clf has to detect "cats".

This is how I go on:

I have 50 pictures of Cats and 50 pictures of "none cats".

  1. get descriptors for data_set with sift-feature detector
  2. Split data into training set and test set (25 pictures cats + 25 pictures non cats = training_set, test_set same)
  3. get cluster centers with kmeans from the training_set
  4. create histogramm data of the training_set an test_set by using the cluster centers
  5. try this code from scikit-learn:

    tuned_parameters = [{'kernel': ['rbf'], 'gamma': [1e-3, 1e-4],
                     'C': [1, 10, 100, 1000]},
                    {'kernel': ['linear'], 'C': [1, 10, 100, 1000]}]
    
    scores = ['precision', 'recall']
    
    for score in scores:
      print("# Tuning hyper-parameters for %s" % score)
      print()
    
      clf = GridSearchCV(SVC(C=1), tuned_parameters, cv=5, scoring=score)
      clf.fit(X_train, y_train)
    
      print("Best parameters set found on development set:")
      print()
      print(clf.best_estimator_)
      print()
      print("Grid scores on development set:")
      print()
      for params, mean_score, scores in clf.grid_scores_:
         print("%0.3f (+/-%0.03f) for %r"
              % (mean_score, scores.std() / 2, params))
      print()
      print("Detailed classification report:")
      print()
      print("The model is trained on the full development set.")
      print("The scores are computed on the full evaluation set.")
      print()
      y_true, y_pred = y_test, clf.predict(X_test)
      print y_true
      print y_pred
      print(classification_report(y_true, y_pred))
      print()
      print clf.score(X_train, y_train)
      print "score"
      print clf.best_params_
      print "best_params"
      pred = clf.predict(X_test)
      print accuracy_score(y_test, pred)
      print "accuracy_score"
    

and I get that result:

# Tuning hyper-parameters for recall
()
/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/sklearn/metrics/metrics.py:1760: UserWarning: The sum of true positives and false positives are equal to zero for some labels. Precision is ill defined for those labels [ 0.]. The precision and recall are equal to zero for some labels. fbeta_score is ill defined for those labels [ 0.]. 
  average=average)
/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/sklearn/metrics/metrics.py:1760: UserWarning: The sum of true positives and false positives are equal to zero for some labels. Precision is ill defined for those labels [ 1.]. The precision and recall are equal to zero for some labels. fbeta_score is ill defined for those labels [ 1.]. 
  average=average)
Best parameters set found on development set:
()
SVC(C=0.001, cache_size=200, class_weight=None, coef0=0.0, degree=3,
  gamma=0.001, kernel=rbf, max_iter=-1, probability=False,
  random_state=None, shrinking=True, tol=0.001, verbose=False)
()
Grid scores on development set:
()
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 0.001, 'gamma': 0.001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 0.001, 'gamma': 0.0001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 0.01, 'gamma': 0.001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 0.01, 'gamma': 0.0001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 0.10000000000000001, 'gamma': 0.001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 0.10000000000000001, 'gamma': 0.0001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 1.0, 'gamma': 0.001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 1.0, 'gamma': 0.0001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 10.0, 'gamma': 0.001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 10.0, 'gamma': 0.0001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 100.0, 'gamma': 0.001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 100.0, 'gamma': 0.0001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 1000.0, 'gamma': 0.001}
0.800 (+/-0.200) for {'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 1000.0, 'gamma': 0.0001}
()
Detailed classification report:
()
The model is trained on the full development set.
The scores are computed on the full evaluation set.
()
[ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.
  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.
  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
[ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.
  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.
  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.]
             precision    recall  f1-score   support

        0.0       1.00      0.04      0.08        25
        1.0       0.51      1.00      0.68        25

avg / total       0.76      0.52      0.38        50

()
0.52
score
{'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 0.001, 'gamma': 0.001}
best_params
0.52
accuracy_score

seems to be that the clf says to all thinks its a cat....but why?

Is the data_set to small to get a good result ?

Edit: I'm using VLFeat to detecting sift descriptor

Functions:

def create_descriptor_data(data, ID):
    descriptor_list = []
    datas = numpy.genfromtxt(data,dtype='str')
    for p in datas:
      locs, desc = vlfeat_module.vlf_create_descriptors(p,str(ID)+'.key',ID) # create descriptors and save descs in file
      if len(desc) > 500:
        desc = desc[::round((len(desc))/400, 1)] # take between 400 - 800 descriptors
      descriptor_list.append(desc)
      ID += 1 # ID for filename
    return descriptor_list

# create k-mean centers from all *.txt files in directory (data)
def create_center_data(data):
    #data = numpy.vstack(data)
    n_clusters = len(numpy.unique(data))
    kmeans = KMeans(init='k-means++', n_clusters=n_clusters, n_init=1)
    kmeans.fit(data)
    return kmeans, n_clusters

def create_histogram_data(kmeans, descs, n_clusters):
    histogram_list = []
    # load from each file data
    for desc in descs:
      length = len(desc)
      # create histogram from descriptors
      histogram = kmeans.predict(desc)
      histogram = numpy.bincount(histogram, minlength=n_clusters) #minlength = k in k-means 
      histogram = numpy.divide(histogram, length, dtype='float')
      histogram_list.append(histogram)
    histogram = numpy.vstack(histogram_list)
    return histogram

and the call:

X_desc_pos = lib.dataset_module.create_descriptor_data("./static/picture_set/dataset_pos.txt",0) # create desc from dataset_pos, 25 pics
X_desc_neg = lib.dataset_module.create_descriptor_data("./static/picture_set/dataset_neg.txt",51) # create desc from dataset_neg, 25 pics

X_train_pos, X_test_pos = train_test_split(X_desc_pos, test_size=0.5)
X_train_neg, X_test_neg = train_test_split(X_desc_neg, test_size=0.5)

x1 = numpy.vstack(X_train_pos)
x2 = numpy.vstack(X_train_neg)
kmeans, n_clusters = lib.dataset_module.create_center_data(numpy.vstack((x1,x2)))

X_train_pos = lib.dataset_module.create_histogram_data(kmeans, X_train_pos, n_clusters)
X_train_neg = lib.dataset_module.create_histogram_data(kmeans, X_train_neg, n_clusters)

X_train = numpy.vstack([X_train_pos, X_train_neg])
y_train = numpy.hstack([numpy.ones(len(X_train_pos)), numpy.zeros(len(X_train_neg))])

X_test_pos = lib.dataset_module.create_histogram_data(kmeans, X_test_pos, n_clusters)
X_test_neg = lib.dataset_module.create_histogram_data(kmeans, X_test_neg, n_clusters)

X_test = numpy.vstack([X_test_pos, X_test_neg])
y_test = numpy.hstack([numpy.ones(len(X_test_pos)), numpy.zeros(len(X_test_neg))])

tuned_parameters = [{'kernel': ['rbf'], 'gamma': [1e-3, 1e-4],
                     'C': [1, 10, 100, 1000]},
                    {'kernel': ['linear'], 'C': [1, 10, 100, 1000]}]

scores = ['precision', 'recall']

for score in scores:
    print("# Tuning hyper-parameters for %s" % score)
    print()

    clf = GridSearchCV(SVC(C=1), tuned_parameters, cv=5, scoring=score)
    clf.fit(X_train, y_train)

    print("Best parameters set found on development set:")
    print()
    print(clf.best_estimator_)
    print()
    print("Grid scores on development set:")
    print()
    for params, mean_score, scores in clf.grid_scores_:
       print("%0.3f (+/-%0.03f) for %r"
              % (mean_score, scores.std() / 2, params))
    print()
    print("Detailed classification report:")
    print()
    print("The model is trained on the full development set.")
    print("The scores are computed on the full evaluation set.")
    print()
    y_true, y_pred = y_test, clf.predict(X_test)
    print y_true
    print y_pred
    print(classification_report(y_true, y_pred))
    print()
    print clf.score(X_train, y_train)
    print "score"
    print clf.best_params_
    print "best_params"
    pred = clf.predict(X_test)
    print accuracy_score(y_test, pred)
    print "accuracy_score"

EDIT: Some changes by updating the range and savae again the "accuracy"

# Tuning hyper-parameters for accuracy
()
Best parameters set found on development set:
()
SVC(C=1000.0, cache_size=200, class_weight=None, coef0=0.0, degree=3,
  gamma=1.0, kernel=rbf, max_iter=-1, probability=False, random_state=None,
  shrinking=True, tol=0.001, verbose=False)
()
Grid scores on development set:
()
...
()
Detailed classification report:
()
The model is trained on the full development set.
The scores are computed on the full evaluation set.
()
[ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.
  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.
  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
[ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  1.  0.  1.  1.  1.
  1.  1.  1.  0.  1.  1.  1.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  1.  0.  0.  0.
  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  1.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
             precision    recall  f1-score   support

        0.0       0.88      0.92      0.90        25
        1.0       0.92      0.88      0.90        25

avg / total       0.90      0.90      0.90        50

()
1.0
score
{'kernel': 'rbf', 'C': 1000.0, 'gamma': 1.0}
best_params
0.9
accuracy_score

but by testing it on a picture with

rslt = clf.predict(test_histogram)

he's still saying to a sofa: "you're a cat" :D

share|improve this question
    
You should add code for creating a training/testing sets, as this can be a problem here –  lejlot Aug 13 '13 at 13:52
1  
The first thing you should do is from __future__ import print_function to get rid of those annoying ()s. –  larsmans Aug 13 '13 at 14:04
    
yes but i think this is not the problem here ;) –  Linda Aug 13 '13 at 14:06
    
Which scikit-learn version? –  larsmans Aug 13 '13 at 14:18
1  
So it works after changing the range of parameters, as the problem was that the model was not learning at all (assumed everything is a cat) - now is time for a research and optimization, what are the best parameters, best representation etc. do not expect 100% accuracy, in fact it can overfit now, as the matter of fact - size of your dataset is very small, so anything can happen (and by the way, histogram of cat and sofa can be actually very similar, try to visualize your input data and check by yourself). Yet a programming problem seems to be solved. –  lejlot Aug 13 '13 at 16:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are many possibilities of such behaviour:

  • There is an error in creation of the training/testing data [implementation error]
  • Training set of 20 element (25 vectors with 5 cross validation leaves 20 for trianing) can be too small for a good generalization [under fitting]
  • range of checked C and gamma parameters can be too narrow - this variables are highly data dependent, your representations' values can require completely different C's and gamma's then those currently used [under/over fitting]

My personal guess (as without the data is hard to reproduce the issue) here is the third option - bad C and gamma parameters to find a good model.

EDIT

You should try much bigger ranges of values, eg.

  • C between 10^-5 and 10^15
  • gamma between 10^-14 and 10^2

    C=[]
    gamma=[]
    for i in range(21): C.append(10.0**(i-5))
    for i in range(17): gamma.append(10**(i-14))
    

EDIT2

Once parameters' ranges are corrected, now you should perform the actual "case study". Gather more images, analyze your data representation (is histogram really enough for this task?), process your data (is it already normalized? Maybe try some decorrelation?), consider using simplier kernels - rbf can be very deceptive - on one hand it can get great scores during training, but on the other - fail completely during testing. This is a result of its overfitting capabilities (as for any consistent data set RBF-SVM can achieve 100% score during training), so finding a balance between a model's power and generalization abilities is a hard problem. This is when actual "machine learning journey" begins, have fun!

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried this values with the same results:"[{'kernel': ['rbf'], 'gamma': [1e-3, 1e-4],"C": 10. ** numpy.arange(-3, 4)}]".. or do you think i have to look vor bigger/smaller values ? –  Linda Aug 13 '13 at 14:15
1  
I was talking about wider range, not higher resolution. even for such simple data as heart dataset, to correctly investigate the model's parameters one has to check much bigger range: csie.ntu.edu.tw/~cjlin/libsvm –  lejlot Aug 13 '13 at 14:19

seems to be that the clf says to all thinks its a cat....but why?

It's a bit hard to tell from your pasted output, but it seems this is the second iteration of the loop over scores = ['precision', 'recall'], so you're optimizing for recall. That concurs with the classification report, which states that recall is 1.00 (perfect) for the positive class.

When is recall perfect? Well, when there are no false negatives, no cats staying undetected. The easy way to obtain perfect recall is therefore to predict "cat" for every input picture, regardless of whether it's a cat, and GridSearchCV found a classifier that does exactly that.

A similar thing can happen when you optimize for precision: perfect precision can be achieved by never predicting "cat" since you'll have no false positives.

To avoid this situation, optimize for accuracy rather than precision or recall, or for Fᵦ if you have a situation with unbalanced classes.

share|improve this answer
    
sounds logical...i will try this out...but what will be the right way if i wanted to analyze the precision and recall of the clf for a given test_set...think i missunderstood the example –  Linda Aug 13 '13 at 14:56
1  
@Linda: then call classification_report as you did. Calling a metric function after fitting doesn't change the optimization objective. –  larsmans Aug 14 '13 at 7:00

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