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Somewhat related to my previous question here

Is there a way to get the calling Object from within a function or method in d?

example:

class Foo
{
    public void bar()
    {
        auto ci = whoCalledMe();
        // ci should be something that points me to baz.qux, _if_ baz.qux made the call

    }
}

class Baz
{
    void qux()
    {
        auto foo = new Foo();
        foo.bar();
    }
}

Questions:

  1. Does something like whoCalledMe exist? and if so, what is it called?
  2. if something does exist, can it be used at compile time (in a template) and if so, how?

Alternatively;

  1. is it possible to get access to the call stack at runtime? like with php's debug_backtrace?
share|improve this question
    
kinda hard when the call can also be made from main –  ratchet freak Aug 13 '13 at 13:59
    
@ratchetfreak: I am missing the point of your comment? remember the code is there to explain a general thing, not to constrain the question. –  Kris Aug 13 '13 at 14:10
    
I don't think it is possible to achieve what you want in any compiled language. Regarding question 2: at compile time there can be multiple callers of a function, you could get list of all possible callers (and I don't think that is possible in D now). –  Michal Minich Aug 13 '13 at 14:32
    
@MichalMinich: As long as the function I'm calling is a template I can compile a specialized version of the function at compile time. –  Kris Aug 13 '13 at 14:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's not directly possible to get information about your "caller". You might have some luck getting the address from the call stack, but this is a low-level operation and depends on things such as whether your program was compiled with stack frames. After you have the address, you could in theory convert it to a function name and line number, provided debugging symbols are available for your program's binary, but (again) this is highly platform-specific and depends on the toolchain used to compile your program.

As an alternative, you might find this helpful:

void callee(string file=__FILE__, int line=__LINE__, string func=__FUNCTION__)()
{
    writefln("I was called by %s, which is in %s at line %d!", func, file, line);
}

void caller()
{
    // Thanks to IFTI, we can call the function as usual.
    callee();
}

But note that you can't use this trick for non-final class methods, because every call to the function will generate a new template instance (and the compiler needs to know the address of all virtual methods of a class beforehand).

share|improve this answer
    
i'd found, and even used, FILE and LINE before but didn't know about FUNCTION yet. are there more of these "magic constants"? –  Kris Aug 13 '13 at 14:24
2  
__FUNCTION__ was added recently. The list for this family of keywords is here. –  CyberShadow Aug 13 '13 at 14:25
1  
hm this adds a lot of code bloat if you use it many times... its a not that ideal solution –  Quonux Aug 15 '13 at 7:39
1  
To avoid "code bloat", make the template a stub that simply passes the compile-time variables to a non-template function as run-time variables. With -inline, it will be as if the second function was called directly with the file and line specified at the call site. –  CyberShadow Aug 15 '13 at 9:00
1  
In general, __FILE__, __LINE__, and __FUNCTION__ should only be used as function arguments, not template arguments. Otherwise, you end up instantiating the function again every time you call it. And usually, it works just fine to add them as default arguments to the end of a function's signature. Advising anyone to use them as template arguments is almost always bad advice. Also, when you use them as function arguments, you don't need a template, and it'll work with virtual functions. –  Jonathan M Davis Aug 16 '13 at 19:51

To expand on what CyberShadow said, since you can get the fully qualified name of the function by using __FUNCTION__, you can also get the function as a symbol using a mixin:

import std.stdio;
import std.typetuple;

void callee(string file=__FILE__, int line=__LINE__, string func=__FUNCTION__)()
{
    alias callerFunc = TypeTuple!(mixin(func))[0];
    static assert(&caller == &callerFunc);

    callerFunc();  // will eventually overflow the stack
}

void caller()
{
    callee();
}

void main()
{
    caller();
}

The stack will overflow here since these two functions end up calling each other recursively indefinitely.

share|improve this answer

Finding the caller is something debuggers do and generally requires having built the program with symbolic debug information switches turned on. Reading the debug info to figure this out is highly system dependent and is pretty advanced.

The exception unwinding mechanism also finds the caller, but those tables are not generated for functions that don't need them, and the tables do not include the name of the function.

share|improve this answer
    
How about if I were to request a feature __CLASS__ like there are already __FILE__, __LINE___ and __FUNCTION__? While we're at it I should probably also ask for __MODULE__. I'm more than willing to "do the required paperwork" by the way. –  Kris Aug 15 '13 at 8:35
    
__MODULE__ is already implemented. You can extract the class from __FUNCTION__, since it is fully-qualified. –  CyberShadow Aug 15 '13 at 9:02
    
@CyberShadow I could, but why require the clutter? It seems to fit too well with the other magic constants to not be there to me. So well actually that its absence could be seen as somewhat surprising. Must've read over __MODULE__ since it's not in the code sample. My bad. –  Kris Aug 19 '13 at 20:35
    
Every language addition must carry its weight. Besides, how do you expect it to work with nested classes? –  CyberShadow Aug 20 '13 at 9:19

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