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Using ruby 1.9.3, I need to do the following:

test_ids.each do |x|
    if x == 1
        y = x+1
    elsif x == 2
        y = x+2
    elsif x == 3
        (end loop here, start over with next test_id)
    else
        y = x+4
    end
end

I just need the loop to continue with the next object in the array if a condition is met instead of continuing throughout the script. How is this possible?

EDIT:

The end goal is something like this:

case x
    when 1
        abort
    when 2
        ...
    else
        ...
end

puts x+2

So as you can see, x is being used after the if case statement. I need to not run the puts statement if x = 1. I don't want to abort the script and terminate it altogether, I just want to skip that array object and go to the next one. Any suggestions?

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2  
I doubt this does what you expect. = assigns a value to x so your code only executes x = 1 inside the loop. Instead you need a comparison using ==. –  the Tin Man Aug 13 '13 at 14:03
    
It's important to understand that, given the code you have, a next will do nothing special. Once the elsif x == 3 matches and your code falls into that block, when it exits it's going to fall through and implicitly do a next. The only time you'd need a next is if there is additional code after the end statement you wanted to avoid. No other elsif statements would be executed nor would else occur. –  the Tin Man Aug 13 '13 at 14:47
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are looking for the next command.

test_ids.each do |x|
  if x == 1
    y = x+1
  elsif x == 2
    y = x+2
  elsif x == 3
    next
  else
    y = x+4
  end
end
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Ah, next. Simple enough. Thanks for the help! –  Luigi Aug 13 '13 at 14:40
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= assigns a value to x so your code only executes x = 1 inside the loop.

Instead you need a comparison using == in your if statements.

You could have avoided this using a case statement:

case x
when 1
  ...
when 2
  ...
when 3
  ...
else
  ...
end

In my experience using case tends to clarify code compared to multiple if/else/elsif.

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Indeed, I just left off my ==. And I agree case is more preferable, thanks for that tip. I'm still a little confused though. I edited my question for more clarification. –  Luigi Aug 13 '13 at 14:40
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