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Is this the correct way to imitate a static method in Python? Does Python allow static methods?

class C(object):

    def show(self,message):
        print("The message is: {}".format(message))

m = "Hello World!"
C.show(C,message=m)

The message is: Hello World!

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marked as duplicate by Robert Harvey Aug 13 '13 at 19:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should use @classmethod:

@classmethod
def show(cls, message):
        print("The message is: {}".format(message))

The difference between a classmethod and a staticmethod is that the latter knows nothing about its enclosing class, whereas the former does (via the cls argument). A staticmethod can just as easily be declared outside the class.

If you don't want show() to know anything about C, either use @staticmethod or declare show() outside of C.

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On classmethods, better use cls instead of self. –  glglgl Aug 13 '13 at 14:16
    
@glglgl Right, thanks :) –  arshajii Aug 13 '13 at 14:16
    
This is incorrect. See @glglgl answer. –  JHarris Aug 13 '13 at 14:17
1  
@JHarris Ist is another valid way to do so; it will work as well. Mine is cleaner, however. –  glglgl Aug 13 '13 at 14:18
1  
It works sure, but it's not right ;) –  JHarris Aug 13 '13 at 14:19

The idiomatic translation of a static method from other languages is usually a module-level method.

def show(message):
    print("The message is: {}".format(message))

The answers telling you that python has @staticmethods are correct, and also misleading: it is usually correct to just use a module-level function.

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You should use @staticmethod:

@staticmethod
def show(message):
    print("The message is: {}".format(message))
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Sorry, @arshajii, could not resist to imitate your answer 1:1 :-) –  glglgl Aug 13 '13 at 14:17
1  
It all depends if they're after a C++ style static method aka, a Python class method, or a Python static method, which is rarely of any use –  Jon Clements Aug 13 '13 at 14:18
1  
I guess @JonClements is right, we're missing some context. Static methods are good for grouping functionality which doesn't operate on an instance. See Raymond Hettinger's class tools talk from PyCon for some extra stuff on that. –  JHarris Aug 13 '13 at 14:21
1  
Downvote? Why? It is definitely not complete wrong, as far as we can tell by now. –  glglgl Aug 13 '13 at 14:28
    
@GLES And if someone downvotes your question, you downvote all your answers? Wow. –  glglgl Aug 13 '13 at 14:34

You can use the decorator @classmethod. That won't pose a problem. Additionally

if a class method is called for a derived class, the derived class object is passed as the implied first argument (http://docs.python.org/3.3/library/functions.html#classmethod).

class C1(object):

    @classmethod
    def show(cls,message):
        print("[{}] The message is: {}".format(cls,message))

class C2(C1):
    pass

m = "Hello World!"
C2.show(message=m)
# vs. C1.show(message=m) with output [<class '__main__.C1'>] The message is: Hello World!

[<class '__main__.C2'>] The message is: Hello World!

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