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This is a question about conventions. The two sets of commands below return identical results.

a = [1, 2, 3]

a.first  # => 1
a[0]     # => 1

a.last   # => 3
a[-1]    # => 3

Which of these is preferred in Ruby, the explicit index or the functions? Assuming, of course, that this is in code which always accesses the first or last element.

Note: I've been thinking about the cycles each would take. Because first and last accept parameters, they will have a little more overhead, but I don't know if that affects what the community prefers.

Thanks!


EDIT

If you read the comments on this post, there was a big debate about my last paragraph. While I failed to remember that [x] is equivalent to .[](x), I was correct in my conclusion that first and last have a bit more overhead. Considering the nature of both, I believe that this is due to the argument check for first/last. These need to check if there are arguments whereas [] can assume that they exist.

CODE

require 'benchmark'

a = [1..1000]

MAX = 1000000

Benchmark.bm(15) do |b|
  b.report("small first") { MAX.times do; a.first; end }
  b.report("small [0]")   { MAX.times do; a[0];    end }
  b.report("small last")  { MAX.times do; a.last;  end }
  b.report("small [-1]")  { MAX.times do; a[-1];   end }
end

a = [1..100000000000]

Benchmark.bm(15) do |b|
  b.report("large first") { MAX.times do; a.first; end }
  b.report("large [0]")   { MAX.times do; a[0];    end }
  b.report("large last")  { MAX.times do; a.last;  end }
  b.report("large [-1]")  { MAX.times do; a[-1];   end }
end

RESULTS

                      user     system      total        real
small first       0.350000   0.000000   0.350000 (  0.901497)
small [0]         0.330000   0.010000   0.340000 (  0.857786)
small last        0.370000   0.000000   0.370000 (  1.054216)
small [-1]        0.370000   0.000000   0.370000 (  1.137655)
                      user     system      total        real
large first       0.340000   0.010000   0.350000 (  0.897581)
large [0]         0.320000   0.010000   0.330000 (  0.889725)
large last        0.350000   0.000000   0.350000 (  1.071135)
large [-1]        0.380000   0.000000   0.380000 (  1.119587)
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closed as primarily opinion-based by lurker, the Tin Man, sawa, Borodin, Soner Gönül Aug 13 '13 at 19:25

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
I believe it is .first and .last because it makes it easier to ready and ruby is a language that is meant to be read. Also it makes it easier for people to glance through your code and know what you are doing –  Tall Paul Aug 13 '13 at 14:48
2  
This is probably a matter of opinion more than "what's best", but I would prefer first and last if that's exactly what I meant. If you're really concerned about real time performance, Ruby's probably not your best choice of scripting languages. ;) –  lurker Aug 13 '13 at 14:50
1  
We use first and last because they're available. They're available because they're needed a lot more often. Other accessors to array positions are available in Rails, but they're really not that useful or readable and, though people could use them, we see [n] notation more often. It's not really that much harder to read [n], and it's infinitely more practical as they're easy to use in loops. –  the Tin Man Aug 13 '13 at 14:55
1  
From The Ruby Style Guide: When accessing the first or last element from an array, prefer first or last over [0] or [-1]. –  Stefan Aug 13 '13 at 15:05
    
I don't understand your last paragraph. [] accept parameters as well. –  sawa Aug 13 '13 at 15:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

TL;DR

Code is read more than it is written, and first and last take less effort, especialy for a less experienced Ruby programmer or someone from another programming language to understand.


first and last are usually prefered, because they communicate your intention with a little less thinking. While most programmers will immediately know that these are the same:

a.first
a[0]

The first still reads more easily. There isn't a marked difference in how hard it is to read, but it's there.

last, however, is another issue. Accessing the index 0 will get you the first element of an array in almost all languages. But negative indexing is only available in a few languages, and it's use often differs. If a C programmer with minimal Ruby experience is trying to read my code, which will they understand faster?:

a.last
a[-1]

The negative index will probably force them to do a Google search.

share|improve this answer
    
I had faced the same when I started Ruby with the style a[-1]... :) :) –  Arup Rakshit Aug 13 '13 at 15:09
1  
@Babai: So did I. That's why it's good for its more powerful uses (eg. a[0..-1]) but not for just getting the last element. –  Linuxios Aug 13 '13 at 15:12
    
A C programmer would also grimace and think "Oh my gosh, they are reading random data!" (data at address of a - sizeof(a)). –  James R. Aug 13 '13 at 16:11
    
Downvoter? Explaination? –  Linuxios Aug 13 '13 at 16:12
    
@JamesR. Yep. It's not intuitive notation. –  Linuxios Aug 13 '13 at 16:12

Since Matz designed Ruby after a few other languages, I think the conventions come from those other languages.

In Lisp, one of Ruby's inspirational parents, you would use something close to the last and first methods so I'll say last and first is convention.

I only really use first and last. I see many programs out there that use those methods but ultimately it is your choice. That's the beauty of Ruby ;)

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From the point of view of the speed, for larger arrays, first and last are faster than []. For smaller arrays it is the other way around.

Large array:

array = (0..100000000).to_a

t = Time.now
10.times{array[0]}
puts Time.now - t
# => 0.000225356

t = Time.now
10.times{array.first}
puts Time.now - t
# => 2.9736e-05

t = Time.now
10.times{array[-1]}
puts Time.now - t
# => 7.847e-06

t = Time.now
10.times{array.last}
puts Time.now - t
# => 6.174e-06

Small array:

array = (0..100).to_a

t = Time.now
10.times{array[0]}
puts Time.now - t
# => 4.403e-06

t = Time.now
10.times{array.first}
puts Time.now - t
# => 5.933e-06

t = Time.now
10.times{array[-1]}
puts Time.now - t
# => 4.982e-06

t = Time.now
10.times{array.last}
puts Time.now - t
# => 5.411e-06

For ease of writing/reading, first and last can be used without arguments, unlike [], so they are simpler.

Sometimes, using first and last makes things easier, while it is difficult with []: e.g., array.each_slice(3).map(&:first).

share|improve this answer
    
Please provide tests to verify first and last are faster. Intuitively, I would think they would be slower. –  screenmutt Aug 13 '13 at 15:17
    
Can we see benchmarks? I'm curious ;) –  Linuxios Aug 13 '13 at 15:25
    
I just added benchmarks to my question. –  screenmutt Aug 13 '13 at 15:38
    
I upvoted your answer, but @Linuxios had a better answer because it contained more focus and explanation of why convention is easier. Props for doing the testing. BTW benchmark is the best package in ruby! –  screenmutt Aug 13 '13 at 15:39
    
Yeah, I think that is the standard, but its syntax is little too complicated for me. It just doesn't come to mind immediately how to use it when I want to. –  sawa Aug 13 '13 at 15:42

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