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I have a dataframe containing a dates field as text.

I convert the dates field into a date time object using:

df['date'] = pd.to_datetime(df['date'])

Doing:

df['date']

Produces something like this:

0    2012-06-28 09:36:21
1    2013-05-21 14:52:57
2    2011-10-14 16:31:34
3    2011-11-11 12:51:13
4    2013-02-07 15:33:22
5    2013-01-02 14:40:08
6    2013-06-24 14:49:40
7    2013-07-15 15:29:26
8    2011-11-04 12:17:32
9    2013-04-29 17:31:43
10   2013-06-24 15:00:06
11   2012-10-22 18:23:53
12                   NaT
13                   NaT
14   2011-12-13 10:06:18

Now I convert the date time object into a date object:

df['date'].apply(try_convert_date)

(see below for how try_to_convert is defined). I get:

0       2012-06-28
1       2013-05-21
2       2011-10-14
3       2011-11-11
4       2013-02-07
5       2013-01-02
6       2013-06-24
7       2013-07-15
8       2011-11-04
9       2013-04-29
10      2013-06-24
11      2012-10-22
12    0001-255-255
13    0001-255-255
14      2011-12-13

Where the 'NaT' values have been converted to '0001-255-255'. How do I avoid this and keep 'NA' in these cells?

Thanks in advance

def try_convert_date(obj):

    try:
        return obj.date()
    except: #AttributeError:
        return 'NA'
share|improve this question
    
keep in mind that in pandas itself this will not be useful (e.g. date is not a supported dtype). What are you going to do with this? – Jeff Aug 13 '13 at 15:24
    
see github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/9513 – scls Feb 19 '15 at 5:15
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that pd.NaT.date() will not raise an error, it will return datetime.date(1, 255, 255), so the part of your code where you catch an exception will never be reached. You'll have to check if the value is pd.NaT and in that case return 'NA'. In all other cases you can safely return obj.date() since the column has datetime64 dtype.

def try_convert(obj):
    if obj is pd.NaT:
        return 'NA'
    else:
        return obj.date()

n [17]: s.apply(try_convert)
Out[17]:
0     2012-06-28
1     2013-05-21
2     2011-10-14
3     2011-11-11
4     2013-02-07
5     2013-01-02
6     2013-06-24
7     2013-07-15
8     2011-11-04
9     2013-04-29
10    2013-06-24
11    2012-10-22
12            NA
13            NA
14    2011-12-13
Name: 1_2, dtype: object
share|improve this answer

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